CBHC / RCAHMW https://rcahmw.gov.uk On the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Wales Thu, 19 Apr 2018 16:58:15 +0000 en-GB hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.5 PRESS RELEASE – Heritage Angel Awards Wales https://rcahmw.gov.uk/press-release-heritage-angel-awards-wales/ https://rcahmw.gov.uk/press-release-heritage-angel-awards-wales/#respond Wed, 18 Apr 2018 10:18:46 +0000 https://rcahmw.gov.uk/?p=10029

The search is on for Wales’s Heritage Angels

People who rescue historic buildings from neglect are to be recognised as ‘Heritage Angels’ by a new Welsh awards scheme sponsored by the Andrew Lloyd-Webber Foundation. Anyone can nominate a person or project for the awards and the winners will be announced at a glittering awards ceremony in November 2018.

Wales’s Heritage Minister, Dafydd Elis-Thomas, launched the awards scheme on 16 April while visiting Hetty Winding House, near Pontypridd. The Victorian steam-powered winding house transported miners and coal up and down a 360-metre (1,181foot) mine shaft until the Great Western Colliery closed in 1983. The Great Western Colliery Preservation Trust has restored the listed Winding House to working order – ‘a perfect example’ the Minister said, ‘of the sort of project that the Heritage Angel Awards Wales are designed to celebrate’.

The Awards have five categories:

  • Best Rescue of an Historic Building or Place for projects under £5m
  • Best Major Regeneration of an historic building or place for projects in excess of £5m
  • Best Contribution to a Heritage Project by Young People
  • Best Craftsperson or Apprentice on a Heritage Rescue or Repair Project
  • Best Heritage Research, Interpretation or Recording

Examples of previous shortlists from outside Wales have included a dedicated volunteer who maintains historic milestones, a group of ex-servicemen who restore canals, a stonemason who has passed his skills on to hundreds of trainees, a community group that records old chapel and churchyard gravestones, and a volunteer who has developed relaxed autism-friendly tours at his local museum.

Baroness Andrews, Chair of the Heritage Lottery Fund in Wales, has agreed to be a judge. She says “The Heritage Angel Awards are based on a simple idea.  That those who work tirelessly, and often silently, to rescue and care for the heritage of Wales should be thanked and celebrated for the voluntary work they do.   Without them, the less fashionable elements of our heritage might be lost for ever – yet these are the places which mean so much in our communities: the canals and waterways, windmills and railway stations, cinemas, chapels and workmen’s halls.   Without their selfless work, much of the character of Wales, in rural, coastal and urban Wales would be lost.   These ‘Angels’ are not used to telling their stories on a national stage, but the Angel Awards will now enable them to do just that – and to the inspiration of all Wales. HLF is very proud indeed to have a part in this national discovery of the best of our country”.

Nominating people and projects for the awards is simple: you can find full details at www.rcahmw.gov.uk/about-us/heritageangelawardswales.

 

Andrew Lloyd Webber, who founded the Historic England Angel Awards in 2011, said: “I applaud everyone who enters the Angel Awards and showcases their heritage rescues. I am particularly pleased that Wales is on board this year so the Angel Awards are running for the first time in all four home nations. They shine a light on the special individuals and groups who tackle difficult historic buildings and sites at risk across the UK and inspire others to get involved. I am also excited to announce that at the awards ceremony in London this year, we will be presenting a special award to the overall winner from all the Angel Award categories in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales, so I encourage everyone to come forward and send in their applications.”

 

End

Notes for editors

Anyone can nominate people and projects for the awards.

Nomination is simple; a nomination form (plus terms and conditions) can be found on the Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Wales website: https://rcahmw.gov.uk/about-us/heritageangelawardswales/

Nominations are invited under five categories:

  • Best Rescue of an Historic Building or Place for projects under £5m
  • Best Major Regeneration of an historic building or place for projects in excess of £5m
  • Best Contribution to a Heritage Project by Young People
  • Best Craftsperson or Apprentice on a Heritage Rescue or Repair Project
  • Best Heritage Research, Interpretation or Recording

The closing date for nominations is 21 June 2018.

Three people / projects will be selected from each category and the shortlists will be announced on 9 September 2018.

The Awards ceremony will take place in November 2018 [date and location TBC].

The overall winner from all four nations (England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland) will be announced at a gala event in London in November 2018.

The Heritage Angel Awards Wales scheme is sponsored by the Andrew Lloyd Webber Foundation:

About the Andrew Lloyd Webber Foundation
The Andrew Lloyd Webber Foundation was set up by Andrew in 1992 to promote the arts, culture and heritage for the public benefit; since inception Andrew has been the principal provider of funding for all its charitable activities. In 2010, the Foundation embarked on an active grant giving programme and has now awarded grants of over £18m to support high quality training and personal development as well as other projects that make a real difference to enrich the quality of life both for individuals and within local communities. Significant grants include £3.5m to Arts Educational Schools, London to create a state of the art professional theatre, £2.4m to the Music in Secondary Schools Trust, £1m to The Architectural Heritage Fund, $1.3m to the American Theatre Wing and over £350,000 annually to fund 30 performing arts scholarships for talented students in financial need. http://andrewlloydwebberfoundation.com/

The Heritage Angel Awards Wales are supported by a steering group made up of representatives of a number of Welsh organisations including Cadw, the National Trust, the Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Wales, the Heritage Lottery Fund, the Welsh Archaeological Trusts, the Council for British Archaeology Wales Cymru, the Institute of Historic Building Conservation, the Royal Society of Architects in Wales, Glandŵr Cymru – Canal and River Trust in Wales and Wales Council for Voluntary Action.

Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Wales are administrating the Awards in Wales on behalf of the Heritage Angel Awards Wales Steering Group.

The Heritage Angel Awards Wales scheme was launched by Wales’s Heritage Minister, Dafydd Elis-Thomas, during his visit to Hetty Winding House, near Pontypridd on 16 April 2018. Left to Right: Dafydd Elis-Thomas, Wales’s Heritage Minister, Brian Davies, Great Western Colliery Preservation Trust, and Christopher Catling The Secretary (CEO), RCAHMW.

The Heritage Angel Awards Wales scheme was launched by Wales’s Heritage Minister, Dafydd Elis-Thomas, during his visit to Hetty Winding House, near Pontypridd on 16 April 2018. Left to Right: Dafydd Elis-Thomas, Wales’s Heritage Minister, Brian Davies, Great Western Colliery Preservation Trust, and Christopher Catling The Secretary (CEO), RCAHMW.

 

At Hetty Winding House Left to Right: Brian Davies, Great Western Colliery Preservation Trust; Susan Mason, CADW; Christopher Catling The Secretary (CEO), RCAHMW; Dafydd Elis-Thomas, Wales’s Heritage Minister.

At Hetty Winding House Left to Right: Brian Davies, Great Western Colliery Preservation Trust; Susan Mason, CADW; Christopher Catling The Secretary (CEO), RCAHMW; Dafydd Elis-Thomas, Wales’s Heritage Minister.

 

 

Contact details:

Angharad Williams, Public Engagement Manager, Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Wales
01970 621 237       angharad.williams@rcahmw.gov.uk

 

Mae’r datganiad hwn hefyd ar gael yn y Gymraeg.

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The CHERISH Project drone takes off! https://rcahmw.gov.uk/the-cherish-project-drone-takes-off/ https://rcahmw.gov.uk/the-cherish-project-drone-takes-off/#respond Thu, 05 Apr 2018 16:21:57 +0000 https://rcahmw.gov.uk/?p=9705 Dan at the UAV academy 2017.

Dan at the UAV academy 2017.

 

We would like to congratulate our CHERISH Investigator Dan Hunt at the Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Wales who was recently awarded his permission to conduct commercial drone operations (PfCO) by the Civil Aviation Authority. In short this allows Dan to fly the CHERISH drone (a DJI Phantom 4 pro) legally and safely under the Air Navigation Order 2016, and conduct surveys of priority coastal sites.

A number of locations and properties along the Welsh coast can only be surveyed using a drone if the pilot holds a PfCO and valid insurance. With this qualification now in place the CHERISH drone can be used to conduct intensive photogrammetric surveys of eroding coastal heritage sites which can then be used to build 3D digital models, allowing long term change to be monitored. The drone can also be used to photograph eroding sections of sites which may be far too dangerous to visit on foot, or even to survey inaccessible offshore stacks – subject to considerations regarding wildlife and nesting birds.

The CAA permission is hard-won. Dan completed a 2-day ground school with the UAV Academy at Cotswold Airport and then passed a rigorous flight test on a frosty January morning in a field in Wiltshire which included aerobatic manoeuvres, emergency procedures and some tough questioning about the Operations Manual. Well done Dan!

 

Dan passing his practical drone exam with the UAV Academy examiner Jan 2018.

Dan passing his practical drone exam with the UAV Academy examiner Jan 2018.

 

Dan's practical drone exam on a frosty morning in Wiltshire in January 2018.

Dan’s practical drone exam on a frosty morning in Wiltshire in January 2018.

 

Dan piloting the CHERISH drone at Pen Dinas, Aberystwyth.

Dan piloting the CHERISH drone at Pen Dinas, Aberystwyth.

 

Aerial photograph of the Wellington Monument, Pen Dinas Aberystwyth, recorded with the CHERISH drone.

Aerial photograph of the Wellington Monument, Pen Dinas Aberystwyth, recorded with the CHERISH drone.

 

Links:
Some stunning CHERISH drone shots of the coastal hillfort at Pen Dinas Aberystwyth, and the 19th century Wellington Monument on its summit, can be seen at:

Project Links:

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Royal Commission Archive & Library Bulletin of Newly Catalogued Material – March 2018 https://rcahmw.gov.uk/royal-commission-archive-library-bulletin-of-newly-catalogued-material-march-2018/ https://rcahmw.gov.uk/royal-commission-archive-library-bulletin-of-newly-catalogued-material-march-2018/#respond Tue, 03 Apr 2018 10:39:55 +0000 https://rcahmw.gov.uk/?p=9674 Welcome to the latest monthly edition of the National Monuments Record of Wales (NMRW) Archives and Library Bulletin which lists all newly catalogued material. The archival items, library books and journal articles are all available to view in our public reading room. The full archive catalogue is available on Coflein and contains digital copies of many of the items listed. All publications may be found on our online Library Catalogue.

Our Library and reading room is open:
Monday – Friday 09.30 – 16.00,
Wednesday 10.30 – 16.30.
An appointment is advisable.

 

Archives

Tall ship from the Milford Haven Regatta, off West Jetty, South Hook Point, 2008

Tall ship from the Milford Haven Regatta, off West Jetty, South Hook Point, 2008 AP_2008_1412 C.901643 NPRN: 34312

 

Archaeological Perspectives Analysis Consultancy (A.P.A.C. Ltd)
Digital records relating to archaeological investigations at:

CHERISH Project Archive
Baseline aerial reconnaissance survey relating to Black Point Rath, 2017: Ref. No. CH2018_004

Wreck of the Albion, Albion Sands, 2017

Wreck of the Albion, Albion Sands, 2017 CH2018_002_001 C.632417 NPRN: 272842

 

E.W. Lovegrove Collection: Ref. No. EWL
Black and white photographs, and negatives, relating to St. David’s Cathedral
Covering dates: not dated

Heritage Recording Services Wales Project Archives

  • Report and digital files relating to Casey’s Roofing Centre (formerly Landore Cinema), Landore, Swansea, 2017: Ref. No. HRS003

Investigators’ Digital Photography
Photographs of:
Crucis Abbey, 2017:  Ref. No. DS2018_010
Yr Llynnau Mymbyr, 2003-2017: Ref. No. DS2018_011

Dr Mark Redknap Slide Collection: Ref. No. DMR
Slides showing the wreck ‘City of Ottawa’
Covering dates: 1987-2018

Wreck of the City of Ottawa 1987

Wreck of the City of Ottawa 1987 DI2018_004_034 C.632664 NPRN: 442

Books

  • Brooks, John. 1971. Castles of Wales. Jarrold and Sons: Norwich.
  • Casserley, H.C. 1972. Railways since 1939. David and Charles: Newton Abbot.
  • Corris Railway Society. 1988.  A return to Corris: the continuing story of the Corris Railway.  Avon Anglia in conjunction with the Corris Railway Society: Weston-super-Mare.
  • Gifford, Colin T. and Gamble Horace. 1976. Steam railways in industry.  B.T. Batsford: London.
  • Hole, K. [et al.] 1975. Rail 150: the Stockton & Darlington Railway and what followed. Eyre Methuen: London.
  • Household, Humphrey. 1989. Narrow gauge railways: England and the fifteen inch. Sutton: Gloucester.
  • Mann, F.A.W. 1972. Railway bridge construction: some recent developments. Hutchinson: London.
  • Marshall, John. 1978. A biographical dictionary of railway engineers. David and Charles: Newton Abbot.
  • Munns, R.T.  1986. Milk churns to merry-go-round: a century of train operation. David and Charles: Newton Abbot.
  • Panell, J.P.M. 1977. Man the builder: an illustrated history of engineering. Thames and Hudson:  London.
  • Sawford, Eric. 1991. The last days of industrial steam. Alan Sutton: Gloucester.
  • Taylor, A.J. 1969. Castell Caernarfon: Caernarvon Castle. H.M.S.O.: Cardiff.
  • Tucker, Norman. 1951? Gwydir castle. [Gwydir Castle]: [Llanrwst].
  • Young. Simon and Houlbrook, Ceri, [Editors]. 2018. Magical folk: British and Irish fairies: 500 AD to the present. Gibson Square: London.

 

Journals

  • Ancient Monuments Society/The Friends of Friendless Churches Newsletter Part 1 (Spring 2018)
  • Ancient Monuments Society Transactions Volume 062 (2018)
  • Below! Journal of the Shropshire Caving and Mining Club 1/2018 (Spring 2018)
  • British Archaeology, No. 159 (Mar/Apr 2018)
  • Cartographic Journal Vol. 054, no. 04 (November 2017)
  • Ceredigion Vol. 18, no. 1 (2017)
  • Current Archaeology, Issue. 337 (April 2018)
  • Landscapes Vol. 018, No. 2 (November 2017)
  • Medieval Settlement Research No. 32 (2017)
  • Pembrokeshire Life, (March 2018)
  • Railway and Canal Historical Society Bulletin, No 472 (Mar/Apr 2018)
  • Railway and Canal Historical Society Journal, No.231 (March 2018)
  • The Carmarthenshire Antiquary, Vol. 53 (2017)
  • The Victorian No.57 (March 2018)
  • Tools and Trades History Society Newsletter, Vol. 139 (Hilary 2018)
  • Welsh Railways Research Circle Newsletter Vol. 154 (Spring 2018)

 

Journals: Current Awareness

Ancient Monuments Society/The Friends of Friendless Churches Newsletter Part 1 (Spring 2018), p. 5: geocaching on Anglesey; p.6 note on the Priests House, Castlemartin; p. 9-14 casework concerning St Michaels, Cilycwm, Carms.; Hengoed Baptist Church; Our Lady of the Rosary, Penmaenmawr; the demolition of Tudno Castle Hotel, Llandudno; Tathan Hall, St Athan; p. 16 purchase of a vase by William Burgess by NMW; p. 18 purchase of Gunter Mansion, Abergavenny by the Welsh Georgian Trust; p. 20 Church Heritage Cymru, the database of church buildings created by the Church in Wales; p. 22 note on the Cubist Modernism of the Crematorium at Margam; p.26 Ainon Chapel, Llanuwchllyn has been taken over by the Welsh Religious Buildings Trust.

Below! Journal of the Shropshire Caving and Mining Club 1/2018 (Spring 2018), p. 3-7: SCMC trip reports including visits to Camdwrbach, Bryn-y-rfr and Henfwlch mines, Ogof, Llanymynech, Wymess, Fron Goch, Cwmorthin, Cwmystwyth; p. 9: Dinas Silica Mine; p. 11-13: Mines near Nant y Moch Reservoir; p. 14-15: A summary of underground works at Cwmystwyth; p. 24: note on the possibility of restarting gold mining at Clogau and Gwynfynydd gold mines.

Landscapes Vol. 018, No. 2 (November 2017), p. 178-199: Mapping the Nation: Landscapes of Survey and the Material Cultures of the Early Ordnance Survey in Britain and Ireland, Keith D. Lilley.

Medieval Settlement Research No. 32 (2017), p. 27-34: Further research on a predictive model of early medieval settlement locations in South Wales: exploring the use of field-names as proxy data, Andy Seaman.

 

Contact us

If you have any comments or enquiries, please feel free to contact us:

NMRW Library and Enquiries Service
Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Wales
Penglais Road
Aberystwyth
Ceredigion SY23 3BU

Telephone: +44 (0)1970 621200
Fax: +44 (0)1970 627701
Email: nmr.wales@rcahmw.gov.uk
Website: rcahmw.gov.uk

Croesewir gohebiaeth yn y Gymraeg a’r Saesneg | Correspondence welcomed in Welsh and English

 

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Cherish 2018 Professional Seminar https://rcahmw.gov.uk/cherish-2018-professional-seminar/ https://rcahmw.gov.uk/cherish-2018-professional-seminar/#respond Wed, 28 Mar 2018 10:38:59 +0000 https://rcahmw.gov.uk/?p=9662  

CHERISH SEMINAR 2018 Lead Image

On Thursday 17th May 2018 CHERISH will be holding a Free Professional Seminar on Climate Change and Coastal Heritage at Venue Cymru, Llandudno, North Wales.  Presentations will be given from the CHERISH team and professionals working in the historic environment across Wales, Ireland, England and Scotland.  Further detail is available on the Eventbrite page where you can book your place.

GROUP LOGOS

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A Hidden Landscape Revealed: New archaeological discoveries made on RSPB Ramsey Island, Pembrokeshire https://rcahmw.gov.uk/a-hidden-landscape-revealed-new-archaeological-discoveries-made-on-rspb-ramsey-island-pembrokeshire/ https://rcahmw.gov.uk/a-hidden-landscape-revealed-new-archaeological-discoveries-made-on-rspb-ramsey-island-pembrokeshire/#respond Fri, 23 Mar 2018 08:35:22 +0000 https://rcahmw.gov.uk/?p=9631 Ramsey Island (Crown Copyright RCAHMW AP_2011_4374)

Ramsey Island (Crown Copyright RCAHMW: AP_2011_4374)

 

A new airborne laser survey of RSPB Ramsey Island has revealed a hidden archaeological landscape thought to date back 4,500 years to the Bronze Age, changing our understanding of how this isolated Pembrokeshire island was settled while providing a powerful new management tool for the RSPB.

The airborne laser survey was commissioned by archaeologists from the Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Wales as part of the new European-funded Ireland-Wales CHERISH project investigating climate change and coastal heritage. The data captured during the survey has enabled the creation of a highly detailed 3D model of Ramsey Island for the first time. Not only has this led to the discovery of new archaeological sites but it also provides an accurate and precise dataset which can be used to monitor environmental changes on the island as a result of climate change. The CHERISH Project is funded through the EU’s Ireland Wales Co-Operation Programme 2014-20.

The new survey has revealed exciting sites such as Bronze Age round barrows, a prehistoric coastal promontory fort, the possible site of a lost chapel and a multitude of ancient field systems. These discoveries are forcing archaeologists to change their interpretation of how humans would have interacted with Ramsey Island during the last 4,000-5,000 years.

Airborne laser scanning (LiDAR) of Ramsey Island (Crown CHERISH PROJECT 2017. Produced with EU funds through the Ireland Wales Co-operation Programme 2014-2020. All material made freely available through

Airborne laser scanning (LiDAR) of Ramsey Island (Crown: CHERISH PROJECT 2017. Produced with EU funds through the Ireland Wales Co-operation Programme 2014-2020. All material made freely available through the Open Government Licence).

 

The highly detailed airborne laser scanning (LiDAR) flown by Bluesky International LTD in February 2017 provides a unique and unparalleled view of the whole Island at a resolution of 25cm. Different 3D visualisations have revealed many archaeological earthworks for the first time which are either inaccessible on foot or are too subtle to see on the ground due to bracken and scrub vegetation. Historical aerial imagery from the National Monuments Record of Wales archive in Aberystwyth has also been studied to identify cropmarks of underlying archaeology that has been ploughed flat in modern times.

Previous surveys carried out during the mid-1990s by archaeologists Heather and Terry James for the RSPB recorded prehistoric cairns and field systems on the island’s two summits of Carn Ysgubor and Carn Llundain. The CHERISH team has expanded on this work using computer aided mapping from the new LiDAR data, along with digitised historical aerial imagery. From this, archaeologists have now furthered the understanding of how the prehistoric and medieval agricultural landscape may have appeared.

Dan Hunt, CHERISH archaeologist at the Royal Commission, said; ‘We have added a wealth of new archaeological sites to the story of Ramsey Island, using an incredible 3D dataset which has presented us with a stunning view of the island in enormous detail. We look forward to working closely with the wardens of RSPB Ramsey Island, and other colleagues in Pembrokeshire Coast National Park, to investigate these discoveries further’.

3D view of Ramsey Island from the south-east generated from the LiDAR. Colours differentiate height above sea level. (Crown CHERISH PROJECT 2017. Produced with EU funds through the Ireland Wales Co-opera

3D view of Ramsey Island from the south-east generated from the LiDAR. Colours differentiate height above sea level. (Crown: CHERISH PROJECT 2017. Produced with EU funds through the Ireland Wales Co-operation Programme 2014-2020. All material made freely available through the Open Government Licence).

 

Mapping the past

The new computer aided mapping combines previous surveys with new discoveries. Archaeological features depicted on the new mapping range from Bronze Age burial mounds to ploughed-out post-medieval field boundaries, all of which build a picture of how the landscape may have appeared throughout the ages.

Prehistoric discoveries:

The prehistoric landscape of Ramsey Island extends to the northern most tip of the island where the site of a possible prehistoric coastal promontory fort has been identified on the high rocky promontory of Trwyn-SiÔn-Owen. This defended coastal fort was probably a permanent defended settlement or a gathering place for people living and farming on the island. The visible remains comprise a broad ditch that separates the promontory from the mainland, dividing two distinct areas of the island. The site will now be further investigated by the CHERISH project and monitored to track any coastal erosion at the site.

Medieval remains:

The medieval and post-medieval periods are also well represented on Ramsey Island. Much of this evidence comprises ancient plough ridges, mostly confined to northern and central areas; however, there are also earthworks that suggest settlement, industry and religious practice.

To the north of Carn Ysgubor are the remains of medieval and post-medieval ridge and furrow. Emerging from the ridges are the remains of an earthen platform, possibly the former site of a small rectangular building. Also within this area, as well as in the south of the island are the remains of several possible pillow mounds, suggestive of husbandry on the island, that may have hosted an abundance of rabbits during the medieval and post-medieval periods.

North of the farmhouse are yet more remains which indicate the extensive medieval agricultural landscape including the possible site of the lost chapel ‘Capel Dyfanog’. Here the remains of a complex formed of ponds, platforms and enclosures, which straddle the east coast of the island, represent a fitting site for a medieval ecclesiastical precinct that would have afforded a unique view across the waters of Ramsey Sound towards the city of St Davids.

About CHERISH:

The CHERISH project (Climate, Heritage and Environments of Reefs, Islands and Headlands) is an exciting new five year European funded project that commenced on 1st January 2017. The project will bring together the two nations of Wales and Ireland to increase knowledge and understanding of the impacts (past, present and near-future) of climate change, storminess and extreme weather events on coastal cultural heritage. Over the course of the five years the project will receive more than €4m funding through the EU’s Ireland Wales Co-Operation Programme 2014-20, priority 2 – adaption of the Irish Sea and coastal communities to climate change.

About RSPB Ramsey Island:

Ramsey Island is one of the best places for wildlife in the UK, and is recognised as both a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) and a Natura 2000 site. Ramsey is a Special Protection Area for chough and keeping the grassland short and grazed enables these birds to probe for their invertebrate food.

Dan Hunt is the Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Wales’s Archaeological Investigator for the CHERISH project
daniel.hunt@rcahmw.gov.uk

CHERISH Project: www.cherishproject.eu  |  Facebook: CHERISH Project  |  Twitter@CHERISHProj

RSPB Ramsey Island: https://www.rspb.org.uk/reserves-and-events/reserves-a-z/ramsey-island/

 

CHERISH & EU FUNDS Logo NEW

 

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