CBHC / RCAHMW https://rcahmw.gov.uk On the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Wales Fri, 03 Dec 2021 12:21:40 +0000 en-GB hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8.2 Cwmbran: ‘Where the Future is Happening Now!’ https://rcahmw.gov.uk/cwmbran-where-the-future-is-happening-now/ https://rcahmw.gov.uk/cwmbran-where-the-future-is-happening-now/#respond Fri, 03 Dec 2021 12:17:11 +0000 https://rcahmw.gov.uk/?p=23272 Join us online for this year’s Royal Commission Christmas Lecture, “Cwmbran: ‘Where the Future is Happening Now!’” by Susan Fielding, Senior Investigator (Historic Buildings), on Thursday, 9 December at 5pm.

Voted Britain’s favourite New Town in 2021

Voted Britain’s favourite New Town in 2021* Cwmbran was built as part of an ambitious, Britain-wide programme to transform the lives of millions in the aftermath of the Second World War. Although often overlooked, Cwmbran is a fascinating, and highly significant, example of how planning and architecture were combined to create a new type of town designed for the people. This talk will chart the building history of the Cwmbran Development Corporation and explain why Cwmbran – birthplace of the Friends of Friendless Churches, Europe’s largest tinsel producer, home of the Wagon Wheel, and free parking capital of the world – is so important in the history of the built environment of Wales.

This talk is based on a new digital publication by the Royal Commission. ‘Cwmbran New Town: An Urban Characterisation Study’ has been written by Susan Fielding, Senior Investigator (Historic Buildings), and will be available as a free eBook from our online bookshop on the day of the lecture, Thursday 9 December.

This detailed account of the history and architecture of Cwmbran, the only first-generation New Town in Wales, has 178 evocative illustrations of post-war renewal, many drawn from Gwent Record Office and Torfaen Museum Trust, as well as from the Commission’s own archive.

‘The building of a new town is not merely a great task of physical construction, it is also a great adventure in social construction, for the new towns must be lively communities with their own civic consciousness and civic pride”, Lewis Silkin, The New Towns Act 1946 (foreword).

Susan Fielding, ‘Cwmbran New Town: An Urban Characterisation Study’ (RCAHMW 202)1, 134 pages with 178 illustrations, ISBN: 978-1-871184-59-7. Available as a free eBook downloadable from the Royal Commission bookshop from Thursday 9 December 2021.

*John Grindrod’s (@Grindrod) World Cup of UK New Towns Twitter poll of 2021 

Images

  1. Early days in Cwmbran. (Cover image) Gwent archives.
  2. Architects sketch by J. C. P. West for the Town Centre. Torfaen Museum Trust Collection. Fig 23
  3. The Oakfield Primary School, built 1955-57 in the ‘county style’ created by Colin Jones of the Monmouthshire County Architects Department, but distinguished by the use of zinc cladding. © Crown Copyright: Homes England available under the Open Government Licence; Gwent Record Office: D2603/C/3472: Cwmbran Development Corporation: Photograph Album, Oakfield, Undated. Fig 28
  4. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, Croesyceiliog. © Crown Copyright: RCAHMW. Fig 52
  5. The roundabout junction of Edlogan Way, a radial road from the eastern neighbourhoods, and Caradog Road forming part of the town centre ring road, with St Davids Road, one of the main north-south thoroughfares. © Crown Copyright: RCAHMW Figure 54
  6. Gwent Square murals by Henry Collins and Joyce Pallot, 1974. © Crown Copyright: RCAHMW. Figure 59
  7. Monmouth House, opened 1967, is remarkable for the William Mitchell sculptures to the external lift shaft. © Crown Copyright: RCAHMW.  Figure 67
  8. The south end of the shopping centre in 1998, with the combination of original building and street furniture, with later shop fronts and the giant protective canopy, added 1986 by Hildebrand & Glicker. © Crown Copyright: RCAHMW. Figure 68
  9. Northville from the air showing the density and pattern of housing layout. © Crown Copyright: Figures 82
  10. The Methodist Church at Fairhill. © Crown Copyright: RCAHMW. Figure 121
  11. The mono-pitched roofs and austere facades of the CDC housing at Teynes. © Crown Copyright: RCAHMW. Figures 134
  12. Cwmbrân: The Town where the future is happening now… Torfaen Museum Trust . Figure 171
Early day sin Cwmbran. (Cover image) Gwent archives.
1. Early days in Cwmbran. (Cover image) Gwent archives.
Architects sketch by J. C. P. West for the Town Centre. Torfaen Museum Trust Collection. Fig 23
2. Architects sketch by J. C. P. West for the Town Centre. Torfaen Museum Trust Collection. Fig 23
The Oakfield Primary School, built 1955-57 in the ‘county style’ created by Colin Jones of the Monmouthshire County Architects Department, but distinguished by the use of zinc cladding. © Crown Copyright: Homes England available under the Open Government Licence; Gwent Record Office: D2603/C/3472: Cwmbran Development Corporation: Photograph Album, Oakfield, Undated. Fig 28
3. The Oakfield Primary School, built 1955-57 in the ‘county style’ created by Colin Jones of the Monmouthshire County Architects Department, but distinguished by the use of zinc cladding. © Crown Copyright: Homes England available under the Open Government Licence; Gwent Record Office: D2603/C/3472: Cwmbran Development Corporation: Photograph Album, Oakfield, Undated. Fig 28
The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, Croesyceiliog. © Crown Copyright: RCAHMW. Fig 52
4. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, Croesyceiliog. © Crown Copyright: RCAHMW. Fig 52
The roundabout junction of Edlogan Way, a radial road from the eastern neighbourhoods, and Caradog Road forming part of the town centre ring road, with St Davids Road, one of the main north-south thoroughfares. © Crown Copyright: RCAHMW Figure 54
5. The roundabout junction of Edlogan Way, a radial road from the eastern neighbourhoods, and Caradog Road forming part of the town centre ring road, with St Davids Road, one of the main north-south thoroughfares. © Crown Copyright: RCAHMW Figure 54
Gwent Square murals by Henry Collins and Joyce Pallot, 1974. © Crown Copyright: RCAHMW. Figure 59
6. Gwent Square murals by Henry Collins and Joyce Pallot, 1974. © Crown Copyright: RCAHMW. Figure 59
Monmouth House, opened 1967, is remarkable for the William Mitchell sculptures to the external lift shaft. © Crown Copyright: RCAHMW.  Figure 67
7. Monmouth House, opened 1967, is remarkable for the William Mitchell sculptures to the external lift shaft. © Crown Copyright: RCAHMW.  Figure 67
The south end of the shopping centre in 1998, with the combination of original building and street furniture, with later shop fronts and the giant protective canopy, added 1986 by Hildebrand & Glicker. © Crown Copyright: RCAHMW. Figure 68
8. The south end of the shopping centre in 1998, with the combination of original building and street furniture, with later shop fronts and the giant protective canopy, added 1986 by Hildebrand & Glicker. © Crown Copyright: RCAHMW. Figure 68
Northville from the air showing the density and pattern of housing layout. © Crown Copyright: Figures 82
9. Northville from the air showing the density and pattern of housing layout. © Crown Copyright: Figures 82
The Methodist Church at Fairhill. © Crown Copyright: RCAHMW. Figure 121
10. The Methodist Church at Fairhill. © Crown Copyright: RCAHMW. Figure 121
The mono-pitched roofs and austere facades of the CDC housing at Teynes and Steils. © Crown Copyright: RCAHMW. Figures 134 and 135
11. The mono-pitched roofs and austere facades of the CDC housing at Teynes. © Crown Copyright: RCAHMW. Figures 134
Cwmbrân: The Town where the future is happening now… Torfaen Museum Trust . Figure 171
12. Cwmbrân: The Town where the future is happening now… Torfaen Museum Trust . Figure 171
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Explore your Archive – Archival Snapshots https://rcahmw.gov.uk/explore-your-archive-archival-snapshots/ https://rcahmw.gov.uk/explore-your-archive-archival-snapshots/#comments Wed, 17 Nov 2021 15:12:00 +0000 https://rcahmw.gov.uk/?p=23224 Join us for a fascinating snapshot into the libraries and archives of the great and the small.

22–26 November 2021, 13:00–14:15

This year for Explore your Archive week, you are invited to a week of free virtual ‘snapshot’ talks on the five main subject areas covered within our library and archives: Archaeology, Architecture, Ecclesiastical Heritage, Industrial Archaeology and Maritime Archaeology.

Each day, recorded ‘snapshot’ talks by archivists, librarians and specialists from external institutions will be broadcast, outlining their collections on the day’s theme or on a specific collection that highlights the theme, plus a presentation from RCAHMW on our own archives.

Monday, 13:00-14:15 – Archaeology 
• Historic England – Highlights of the Archaeological Collections held in the Historic England Archive – Kathy Clough
• St Davids Cathedral – Recording Building Archaeology Since The 12th Century – Ross Cook
• The Archaeology Data Service – An Introduction to the Archaeological Collections – Jenny O’Brien
• Society of Antiquaries – Archaeology in the Collections of The Society of Antiquaries of London – Becky Loughead
• RCAHMW – The RCAHMW and the National Monuments Record of Wales – Gareth Edwards

(Book here)


Tuesday, 13:00-14:15 – Architecture 
• National Museum Wales – A Brief History of the Cathays Park Building – Kristine Chapman
• Society of Antiquaries – Architecture in the Collections of The Society of Antiquaries – Becky Loughead
• Royal Society of Architects in Wales – The Architectural Archives Advisory Panel for Wales – Elinor Weekley
• RCAHMW – Building the Twentieth Century – Susan Fielding

(Book here)


Wednesday, 13:00-14:15 – Ecclesiastical Heritage
• National Library of Wales – Siarteri yn ein Casgliadau Eglwysig: Cipluniau o Gymru yn y Canoloesau (Charters in our Ecclesiastical Collections: Snapshots of Medieval Wales) – Lucie Hobson (Welsh-language talk with captioned translation)
• Dr Williams’s Library – An Insight into Dr Williams’s  Library – Alan Argent
• St Davids Cathedral – St Davids Cathedral Library and Treasury – How to Know What is There? – Mari James
• RCAHMW – The Notebooks of R. E. Kay: Antiquarian of the 20th Century – Megan Ryder

(Book here)


Thursday, 13:00-14:15 – Industrial Archaeology 
• Glamorgan Archives – Glamorgan’s Blood: The Coal Collections at Glamorgan Archives – Rhian Diggins
• Welsh Mills Society – Mills Archives and How They Can Be Used – John Crompton
• Ffestiniog Railway Archives – The Archive of the Ffestiniog Railway Company – Dafydd Gwyn
• RCAHMW – Industrial Wales – Documenting the Rise and Fall of Industry: Archival Snapshots from the NMRW – Louise Barker

(Book here)


Friday, 13:00-14:15 – Maritime Archaeology 
• UK Hydrographic Office – The Collections at the UKHO Archive – Emma Down
• Lloyd’s Register Foundation – Gwneud ymchwil morwrol: Casgliadau Canolfan Treftadaeth ac Addysg Sefydliad Cofrestr Lloyd’ (Doing Maritime Research: Lloyd’s Register Foundation Heritage and Education Centre Collections) – Dr Meilyr Powell (Welsh-language talk with captioned translation)
• University of Southampton – Archives and Special Collections: Our Maritime Archives – Karen Robson, Lara Nelson and Russell Ince
• RCAHMW – Maritime Archaeology in the Archives of the Royal Commission – Dr Julian Whitewright

(Book here)


Please note, each day’s talk must be booked separately via the links in the descriptions above. Should you have any questions please contact marisa.morgan@rcahmw.gov.uk.

These free lectures will be delivered via Zoom and the invitations will be sent to you once you have booked your place. Please don’t forget to download Zoom if you haven’t already!

Tickets will be limited and must be booked in advance.

During 2021 we will be holding special events and regular presentations on our current research projects. All are welcome to these free online events. All talks will be recorded, becoming available in due course on the Royal Commission’s YouTube channel.

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The Shri Swaminarayan Mandir, Cardiff https://rcahmw.gov.uk/the-shri-swaminarayan-mandir-cardiff/ https://rcahmw.gov.uk/the-shri-swaminarayan-mandir-cardiff/#respond Mon, 15 Nov 2021 10:29:37 +0000 https://rcahmw.gov.uk/?p=23010

Did you know that Wales is home to one of the UK’s most beautiful Hindu temples, located in Merches Place, Cardiff, a short distance south of the Principality Stadium?

Walking towards the temple, down streets lined with typical nineteenth-century terraced housing, your eye is drawn to the exotic sight of three white spires rising high above the surrounding rooftops. These gold-topped spires (called shikars) are typical of north Indian temple architecture and they sit above the shrines (sinhashan) at the heart of the temple. The word shikar, derived from shikhara, Sanskrit for ‘mountain peak’, represents mountains reaching to the heavens, a link between the infinity of the heavens and the mundane world below.

Traditionally three spires or domes indicate that this is a major mandir – a word that is often translated as ‘temple’ but that really means ‘a place where humans and gods interact’. Worshippers visit the mandir regularly, first washing their hands in the entrance hall, then climbing the stairs and removing their shoes before entering the main hall. Here they prostrate themselves in front of the shrines as a sign of humility before standing to perform the ritual known as darshan, a word that literally translated means ‘to see’ or ‘to view’.

The most intense form of devotion among Hindus is this face-to-face relationship between deity and devotee. Through looking at the eyes and face of the deity, the deity is able to see you and you are able to receive a share of the divine being’s power and blessings.

The central shrine in the Cardiff mandir holds an image of Shri Swaminarayan as a young man. He is dressed in colourful garments of costly silk, embroidered with gold and silver thread, garlanded with precious jewellery donated by devotees. The silver columns and canopy of the shrine are decorated with lotus flowers , symbolising the fragile beauty and brevity of life and the spiritual quality of detachment, for the lotus flower rises on its long stem high above the mud that sustains it.

The central shrine is devoted to the founder of the Swaminarayan religion, lavishly dressed and bejewelled, respected as a teacher and as an incarnation of Krishna, god of protection, compassion, tenderness and love.

Shri Swaminarayan (‘Shri’ means ‘blessed’ and ‘Swami’ is the title given to a significant master of Hindu philosophy) was born (or incarnated as Hindus would say) on 3 April 1781 and died (or was liberated from his human form) on 1 June 1830. He is revered as a saint and as the founder of a form of Hinduism that that came to the fore in Gujarat at the beginning of the nineteenth century.

Followers would say that he was incarnated to serve a specific purpose: in this case to serve as a reformer, preserving the best of the beliefs and practices of Hinduism from the medieval past, while forging a new form of Hinduism suited to the more modern India brought about in part by the arrival of British influence and control. The Swaminarayan religion has since flourished; there are some 20 million members worldwide, and there are few towns, cities or villages in the large western Indian state of Gujarat that lack a shrine or followers.

The central shrine is flanked by the shrines of the principal saints and deities in the Hindu pantheon. To the right is Hanuman, the monkey-headed god who, in the Ramayana (the epic in which the history of the gods is recorded), saved Shiva from demons and is thus held to protect people and their possessions from evil. He shares his shrine with Surya, god of the sun, dispeller of darkness and ignorance, who empowers knowledge and all life on earth. On the left is Ganesh, the very popular elephant headed son of Shiva, who is associated with physical well-being and prosperity, along with Shiva and Parvati, husband and wife deities with multiple attributes, but here associated with domesticity and happy family life.

The Swaminarayan version of Hinduism has no set rituals and is continually evolving. Devotees distinguish between smriti (traditions that are handed down and that can change) and shruti, the core of Hindu philosophy, which is constant and unchanging. In practical terms, this means that English is now used for lectures and public readings of the Hindu scriptures as well as Gujarati and the temple committee has young members as well as elders – the latter provide advice and knowledge of Hindu traditions, while the younger members bring passion and drive – for example, an increasing commitment to environmental sustainability in all that the temple community does.

For the mandir is not just a place of worship. It is also a social centre, with a sports hall, classrooms, social space, kitchens and a multi-purpose hall that is used for communal festivities, such as the recent Sharad Punam harvest festival, celebrated at full moon in mid-October, at which flowers are offered to Krishna, Shiva and Parvati, and the colourful Diwali festival, held in early November, celebrating the beginning of the Hindu New Year and remembering the gifts bestowed upon the earth by Lakshmi, the deity associated with wealth and prosperity.

One of the Cardiff mandir shrines decorated for the feast of Diwali with offerings of fruit, sweetmeats, milk, oil, ghee and namkeen (savoury snack foods). Once the deities have enjoyed these gifts, they are distributed to members of the congregation to take home. On major feast days, the whole congregation of up to 700 people gathers for a communal meal, prepared in the temple kitchens. Image courtesy of the Shree Swarminaryan Temple Cardiff

The Cardiff mandir was founded by people from the Kutch region of Gujarat who first arrived around 1964 to work in the city’s factories and iron foundries. A major employer was GKN Steelworks, the successor of Dowlais Ironworks which had moved from Merthyr to Cardiff in 1890. At first worshippers gathered in people’s houses or church halls to celebrate religious festivals and other events. In 1978 a committee was formed to raise the funds to buy permanent premises and a former print works that had previously served as a synagogue provided the first temple.

The Hindu population soon outgrew these premises, and the present building – formerly an Irish Club – was acquired on the opposite side of the road from the first temple. This opened on 25 September 1993 but in 2005 the temple committee decided that the building should be made to look more like a traditional temple. Today’s building is thus something of a hybrid – with modern perimeter rooms from the existing building wrapping round the newly built central hall and its shikars, designed in the Indo-Mughal architectural style that was popular in Gujarat during Shri Swaminaryan’s lifetime. Some 6,000 people took part in the festive procession through the city centre that marked the opening of today’s palatial mandir on Saturday 22 September 2007.

Blessing the golden key to the door of the new temple in 2007. Image courtesy of the Shree Swarminarayan Temple Cardiff

I hope this account of the mandir has whetted your appetite to learn more about the building and the practices and the daily life of Hindu members of the Welsh community. Much more information can be found on the temple’s website: www.swaminarayan.wales.

Christopher Catling, The Secretary (CEO).

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Painted Temples: Wallpaintings and Rood-screens in Welsh Churches, 1200–1800 by Richard Suggett https://rcahmw.gov.uk/painted-temples-wallpaintings-and-rood-screens-in-welsh-churches-1200-1800-by-richard-suggett/ https://rcahmw.gov.uk/painted-temples-wallpaintings-and-rood-screens-in-welsh-churches-1200-1800-by-richard-suggett/#respond Fri, 12 Nov 2021 07:03:14 +0000 https://rcahmw.gov.uk/?p=23130

“This is a welcome and treasurable survey of a long-neglected area of Welsh cultural history.” From the Foreword by Dr Rowan Williams, former Archbishop of Canterbury.

This bilingual book was written (‘unlocked’ might be the better word) during the Coronavirus lockdown that began in late March 2020, when libraries, archives and places of worship were firmly closed. Some churches and chapels, already in a precarious position through declining congregations or the need for expensive repairs, may never reopen. This would be a great loss to us all, churchgoers or not, as this book aims to show by charting a history of the parish church through one of its more ephemeral but oddly resilient features: painted images, texts and decoration.

The book begins by discussing the great late-medieval rebuilding of parish churches in Wales before moving on to consider the nature and roles of painted screens and painted walls within these newly roofed and refurnished churches. Numerous ‘set-piece’ paintings are described and there are case-studies of the extraordinary painted interiors at Llancarfan (by Jane Rutherfoord) and Llandeilo Talybont (by Tony Parkinson), the latter church now re-erected at St Fagans with the recreated wallpaintings providing visitors with ‘the shock of the old’.

The story of painted decoration then continues beyond the Reformation into a period when churches were visually transformed through the demolition of rood-lofts and the obliteration of wallpaintings. As the painted image was supplanted by the painted word, so the polychrome church interior became predominantly black and white, apart from the few splashes of colour provided by painted monuments and the Royal Arms – a forceful visual expression of the new relationship between church and state.

The painted inscriptions of the post-Reformation church are of absorbing interest and the ‘chosen sentences’ express not only religious sentiments but unmistakably the increasing importance and status of written Welsh in the late sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Painters emerge as named personalities in the seventeenth century, and the verse autobiography of Thomas Jones of Hereford and Brecon (published in 1641) is a wonderful and unexpectedly idiosyncratic record of the precarious and picaresque world of the artisan adorner of churches.

Inscriptions were less visible in the later eighteenth-century as churches became a more cluttered social space, with competing pews and wall monuments. The walls and ceilings became increasingly bleached of colour in the later eighteenth century, as inserted plaster ceilings hid the trusses of the old open roofs and limewash was applied liberally inside and outside the church. The rediscovery of the colour of the medieval church by antiquarian-minded parsons in the mid-nineteenth century was a revelation, though not without controversy, as high churchmen and low engaged in battles over the propriety of colour and imagery in churches.

The book has been written by Richard Suggett, Senior Investigator (Historic Buildings) at the Royal Commission. The book draws on the records of wallpaintings made for posterity by Commission staff over many years, especially Tony Parkinson, whose gazetteer of mural decoration in Wales has been revised for this book. Drawings and photographs are as important, if not more so, than wordy descriptions. There are several meticulously colour-matched reconstruction drawings by Dylan Roberts, which succeed in conveying the original colour and visual impact of paintings that have inevitably faded. Iain Wright overcame many technical challenges and difficulties of access shortly before his retirement to take the photographs that are an essential component and glorious adornment of this book. We are also grateful for the historic images supplied by our partners, the National Library of Wales, Amgueddfa Cymru–National Museum Wales, and Cadw. In all, there are 275 stunning images, many never published before.

Pre-order

The perfect Christmas present for many! This book will be available from Monday 22 November 2021 and is available to pre-order from our website now. Don’t forget, Friends of the Royal Commission are entitled to a 10% discount on all publication. For further details, please contact Nicola Roberts/Marisa Morgan. Tel: 01970 621248.

Richard Suggett, Temlau Peintiedig: Murluniau a Chroglenni yn Eglwysi Cymru, 1200–1800 / Painted Temples: Wallpaintings and Rood-screens in Welsh Churches, 1200–1800 (RCAHMW, 2021). xii + 366 pages with 275 illustrations. RRP £29.95.
Foreword by Rt Rev. and Rt Hon. Dr Rowan Williams

Images

  1. Cover of book
  2. A Tudor rose at St Cybi’s Church, Holyhead, Anglesey. A drawing by Dylan Roberts with colours restored.
  3. The Seven Deadly Sins at St Cadoc’s Church, Llancarfan, Vale of Glamorgan.
  4. Memento mori in St. Elian’s Church, Llaneilian, Anglesey.
  5. Royal Arms of Charles II dated 1661 in St Saeran’s Church, Llanynys, Denbighshire.
  6. Title page of ‘Mercy Triumphing over Judgement’ by Thomas Jones (London, 1641).
Cover of book: Painted Temples: Wallpaintings and Rood-screens in Welsh Churches, 1200–1800 (RCAHMW, 2021)
1. Painted Temples: Wallpaintings and Rood-screens in Welsh Churches, 1200–1800 (RCAHMW, 2021)
2.	A Tudor rose at St Cybi’s Church,Holyhead, Anglesey. A drawing by Dylan Roberts with colours restored.
2. A Tudor rose at St Cybi’s Church, Holyhead, Anglesey. A drawing by Dylan Roberts with colours restored.
The Seven Deadly Sins at St Cadoc’s Church, Llancarfan, Vale of Glamorgan
3. The Seven Deadly Sins at St Cadoc’s Church, Llancarfan, Vale of Glamorgan
Memento Mori in St. Elian’s church, Llaneilian, Anglesey.
4. Memento mori in St. Elian’s Church, Llaneilian, Anglesey.
Royal Arms of Charles II dated 1661 in St Saeran’s Church, Llanynys, Denbighshire.
5. Royal Arms of Charles II dated 1661 in St Saeran’s Church, Llanynys, Denbighshire.
Title page of Mercy Triumphing over Judgement by Thomas Jones (London, 1641).
6. Title page of ‘Mercy Triumphing over Judgement’ by Thomas Jones (London, 1641).

All images RCAHMW copyright.

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Job Vacancy – Library and Enquiries Assistant https://rcahmw.gov.uk/job-vacancy-library-and-enquiries-assistant/ https://rcahmw.gov.uk/job-vacancy-library-and-enquiries-assistant/#respond Tue, 09 Nov 2021 15:04:40 +0000 https://rcahmw.gov.uk/?p=23122 Are you passionate about the history and heritage of Wales and in the work of the Royal Commission?   

If so, we are looking to recruit a Library and Enquiries Assistant to help us deliver information from the archive and library holdings of the National Monuments Record of Wales to our customers.

The work involves assisting users of our Enquiry Service, both in person and remotely, and contributing to the running of our specialist public library.  Duties include moving records to and from our archive which can be physically demanding.

The ability to communicate in Welsh is essential for this customer-facing post.

Library and Enquiries Assistant

  • Full time: 37 hours per week
  • Salary: £20,500 rising to £23,830 per annum (pay award pending)

Closing date: 5pm on 6 December 2021

Further details and an application pack are available at: Current Vacancies

For an informal discussion about this post please contact Penny Icke, Information Services Manager.  Telephone 01970 621210 or email penny.icke@rcahmw.gov.uk.

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