CBHC / RCAHMW https://rcahmw.gov.uk On the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Wales Fri, 06 Sep 2019 12:08:46 +0000 en-GB hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.2.3 A Dog, a Diary and a 70-year Mystery https://rcahmw.gov.uk/a-dog-a-diary-and-a-70-year-mystery/ https://rcahmw.gov.uk/a-dog-a-diary-and-a-70-year-mystery/#respond Fri, 06 Sep 2019 11:06:48 +0000 https://rcahmw.gov.uk/?p=16456 NEWS RELEASE

Last December, the U-boat Project shared the amazing story how a small terrier named Lotte came to live among the crew of the German submarine U 91 in the spring of 1918. U 91 under the command of Alfred von Glasenapp was patrolling the Irish Sea when they picked up Lotte from aboard the ETHEL. In the story (more details below) we appealed to anyone who may have some information about Lotte’s fate. The team also contacted the German media in the hope of some leads.

This June, we received an email from a direct descendent of Glasnapp and what he told us was quite remarkable. His email is below in full:

Only yesterday I came across the entry on ‘Lotte and the U91’ on your website and at first didn’t believe my eyes. For I had heard the ‘Lotte’ story many times at home and to see it lifted from family lore into the realm of documented history was truly amazing. I never knew what ship Lotte was from and the exact circumstances of its sinking, but I am very happy to be able to provide a little information on Lotte’s later whereabouts.

Alfred von Glasenapp, Lotte’s rescuer and commander of U 91, was my maternal grandfather, whom I have sadly never met. According to my mother, he kept Lotte on his boat till the end of the war, and after being discharged from the navy, he took her with him to live in Johannisburg (today’s Pisz) in East Prussia. Sometime later, however, he had to leave her with relatives of his. Thus, Lotte became their family dog, and my late father, born in 1918, could still recall having played with her when he was very young. She also had offspring but unfortunately died sometime in the 1920s, probably of rabies. My mother, born in 1924, only knew her from hearsay.

On looking through some of her childhood albums, she found a picture of herself with a small dog who is identified as ‘Lotti’ in the caption below the picture. This dog appears to have been of similar built and colouring as Lotte. However, my mother does not recall the situation as she was only two years old when the picture was taken, but it is entirely possible that Lotte was still alive in 1926.

However, what intrigued me even more about your article was the mention it makes of Glasenapp’s private diary, which I thought was lost forever. According to my mother, when my grandparents were evicted from Silesia in 1946, my grandmother hid these diaries in a haystack (of all places), hoping for a quick return, which of course never materialized. Apparently, the war diaries had been extremely dear to my grandfather, who went as far as having the original manuscript typed up by a professional typist and illustrated it with photos taken aboard his U-boat. Till today, my mother has never ceased to lament the loss of these documents.

To think that, despite all odds, the diary may have somehow survived, appears hard to imagine, and yet I find you quoting from it in black and white. I would be very, very grateful if you could provide me with any information about the present location of the document and whether it is possible to obtain a copy, regardless of the cost. My mother, at 95, would be overjoyed if this testimony of her father’s life were indeed to reappear, miraculously, after more than seven decades.

Dr Rita Singer, Community Engagement Officer comments, ‘The story of Lotte and the missing diaries has been an incredible one, and illustrates the very real connection that many of us have to events which seem so long ago.’

Not only do we now have a complete story for Lotte’, we have also shared information on the whereabouts of the extant diaries with Glasenapp’s grandson and also some of the images taken on board U 91 during the spring when Lotte came to live on board a German submarine.

We would like to thank Glasenapp’s descendants, once more for sharing the rest of Lotte’s story with us and giving us permission to publish his email on our blog. After seventy years of believing their grandfather’s and father’s private diaries entirely lost, we hope they are happy to close some of the gaps in their family history.

BACKGROUND TO THE STORY

U 91 under the command of Alfred von Glasenapp was patrolling the Irish Sea. During the first week of their patrol, U 91 spent most of the time hiding from convoys or never getting close enough to a merchant vessel to initiate an attack.

By their second week at sea, however, things began to change and on 26 April, U 91 encountered the small wooden schooner ETHEL transporting a load of Welsh coal from Cardiff to New Ross. In the haste of abandoning their unarmed vessel, the crew forgot their ship’s dog which was promptly rescued by the German submariners and taken aboard U 91 before they scuttled the ETHEL. Alfred von Glasenapp adopted the terrier and named her ‘Lotte’. To everyone’s delight, she quickly settled into life on an active submarine.

Lotte posing on the deck of U 91 between Mr Main, the gunner of the LANDONIA, and James Goodwin, 2nd Officer of the BARON HARRIES
Lotte posing on the deck of U 91 between Mr Main, the gunner of the LANDONIA, and James Goodwin, 2nd Officer of the BARON HARRIES.

In one picture, she can be seen between two prisoners of war that U 91 had taken during this particular spring campaign. In his private diary, Glasenapp also mentions that Lotte enjoyed herself lounging in the sun between the submariners tanning themselves on deck during calm moments at sea. In another picture, taken at a German submarine base in summer 1918, she is surrounded by the entire crew of U 91.

Lotte, centre front row, posing with the crew of U 91 before their departure on a patrol around the Azores in July and August 1918
Lotte, centre front row, posing with the crew of U 91 before their departure on a patrol around the Azores in July and August 1918.
Page from a private photo album of unknown origin dating from the First World War, owned by Alfred von Glasenapp’s grandson
Page from a private photo album of unknown origin dating from the First World War, owned by Alfred von Glasenapp’s grandson. Clockwise from top left: (1) Captain Ellis Morris Roberts of the BIRCHLEAF, taken Prisoner of War by U 91 on 23 February 1918, together with Captain John White of the ROCKPOOL. (2) On board the U 91, possibly showing von Glasenapp second from the left. (3&4) return of the U 91 to Wilhelmshaven after a successful patrol and being welcomed by the Commander of the Submarine Flottilla.

Contact:
Phone: 01970 621200
Website: https://uboatproject.wales/
E-mail: LlongauU@cbhc.gov.uk / UBoat@rcahmw.gov.uk

Twitter: https://twitter.com/LlongauUBoat
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/llongauUboat/

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Royal Commission Archive & Library Bulletin of Newly Catalogued Material – August 2019 https://rcahmw.gov.uk/royal-commission-archive-library-bulletin-of-newly-catalogued-material-august-2019/ https://rcahmw.gov.uk/royal-commission-archive-library-bulletin-of-newly-catalogued-material-august-2019/#respond Wed, 04 Sep 2019 08:01:20 +0000 https://rcahmw.gov.uk/?p=16414 Welcome to the latest monthly edition of the National Monuments Record of Wales (NMRW) Archives and Library Bulletin which lists all newly catalogued material. The archival items, library books and journal articles are all available to view in our public reading room. The full archive catalogue is available on Coflein and contains digital copies of many of the items listed. All publications may be found on our online Library Catalogue.

Our Library and reading room is open:
Monday – Friday 09.30 – 16.00,
Wednesday 10.30 – 16.30.
An appointment is advisable.

Archives

Tal-y-llyn Lake, Llanfihangel-y-pennant, 1999
Tal-y-llyn Lake, Llanfihangel-y-pennant, 1999
DI2005_0442 C.821266 NPRN: 402425

Archaeological Reports/Evaluations (non Trust)
Archaeological reports relating to:

  • Slate Wreck Pwll Fanogl site, Menai Strait, Anglesey, 2019: Ref. AENT42_18

Archaeology Wales Project Archives
Project archives relating to:

Lake Vrynwy, Llanwddyn, 1995
Lake Vrynwy, Llanwddyn, 1995
DI2008_1320 C.824446 NPRN: 32442

Bristol and Region Archaeological Services Survey Archives
Project archives relating to:

  • Walled Garden of Drybridge House, Monmouth, 2000: Ref. BRAS010
  • Land at The Cattle Market, Monnow Street, Monmouth, Monmouthshire, 2005: Ref. BRAS018
  • Lower Dock Street, Pillgwenlly, Newport, Gwent, 2006: Ref. BRAS019
  • Land off Heol y Mynydd, Gorseinon, Swansea, 2010: Ref. BRAS022
  • Dewstow Primary School, Green Lane, Caldicot, Monmouthshire, 2012: Ref. BRAS023
  • Llynfi Vale Iron Works, Llynfi Road, Maesteg, 1998: Ref. BRAS024
  • Monmouth School, Glendower Street, Monmouth, Gwent, 2003-2004: Ref. BRAS025
  • The Cattle Market, Monnow Street, Monmouth, 2009: Ref. BRAS026
  • Land at Coleg Gwent, The Rhadyr, Llanbadoc, Monmouthshire, 2009-2012: Ref. BRAS027
  • Meadow View, Caerwent Gardens, Caerwent, Monmouthshire, 2007: Ref. BRAS028
  • Lawrence Crescent, Caerwent, Monmouthshire, 2003: Ref. BRAS029
  • Tesco Store Site, Pontymister Industrial Estate, Risca, c. 2010: Ref. BRAS030
  • Plas Derwen Public House and Hotel, south of Abergavenny Estate, c. 2008: Ref. BRAS031
  • Castle Park Primary School, Church Road, Caldicot, c. 2011: Ref. BRAS032

Cadw Monuments in Care Collection

  • Photographic material relating to various sites in Wales, 1870-2008: Ref. CMC/PA

Clwyd-Powys Archaeological Trust Project Archives
Project archives relating to:

  • Preliminary survey of vessel wreck at Pensarn Beach, Abergele, 2019: Ref. CPATP_053

Corpus of Early Medieval Inscribed Stones Publication Collection
Illustrations of inscribed stone at:

  • Eglwys Gymun, produced for the volume ‘A Corpus of Early Medieval Inscribed Stones and Stone Sculpture in Wales, Volume II: South-West Wales’, 1999: Ref. CEMS/2/02/CM7
  • Bridell, produced for the volume ‘A Corpus of Early Medieval Inscribed Stones and Stone Sculpture in Wales, Volume II: South-West Wales’,1999: Ref. CEMS/2/02/P5

D.B. Hague Slide Collection

  • Colour slides relating to various bridges in Wales, 1965-1979: Ref. DBHC/18

Flintshire County Council Collection

  • Colour photographic survey of ‘3 Bod Hyfryd, Flint. Outbuilding now demolished’, 1998: Ref. FCCC/04/12

H. Collin Bowen Collection: Ref. HCBC
Research papers, produced by H. Collin Bowen, relating mainly to the sunken forest at Wiseman’s Bridge
Covering dates: 1946-1968

Investigators’ Digital Photography
Oblique aerial photographs relating to:

Llanrwst, 2019: Ref. DS2019_042

London, Midland & Scottish Railway Collection: Ref. LMS
Glass plate negative showing various Welsh landscape views, taken by London, Midland & Scottish Railway
Covering dates: 1913-1926

NMR Site Files
Photographic surveys relating to:

Ordnance Survey Vertical Aerial Photography Collection: Ref. C.641133
Digitised copies of 20” B&W aerial photography, taken by the Ordnance Survey
Covering dates: 1963-2009

Raymond W. J. Davies Collection: Ref. RWJD
Photographs and notes relating to antiquarian sites in Wales, produced by Raymond W.J. Davies in the 1970’s
Covering dates: 1970-2000

RCAHMW Colour Oblique Digital Aerial Photographs
Colour, oblique, digital aerial images relating to various sites in Wales: Ref. AP2019_785-AP2019_936
Covering dates: 2013-2015

RCAHMW Digitised Records
Digitised copies of material contained within the NMRW archive: Ref. DI2019_001 – DI2019_005
Covering dates: [various]

Wessex Archaeology Project Archives
Project archives relating to:

  • Lidl Supermarket, Ffordd Parc Ynysderw, Pontardawe, 2016: Ref. WAP/14
  • Brechfa Forest West Wind Farm, Pontardawe, 2016: Ref. WAP/15
  • Glyn Derw High School, Cardiff, 2017: Ref. WAP/16
  • Bryn Cynau Isaf, Cwmffrwd, Carmarthenshire, 2017: Ref. WAP/17
  • Black Rock Road, Portskewett, Monmouthshire, 2018: Ref. WAP/18
Bugeilyn Lake, 2012
Bugeilyn Lake, 2012
AP_2012_4104 C.918199 NPRN: 402607

Books

All our books and journals can be found on the Royal Commission’s Library Catalogue and viewed in our Library and Search Room.

  • Houseman, Mary, 2019. The Wiston Book. Narberth: Llan Aidan Press.
  • Howell, David (ed.), 2019. Pembrokeshire County History. Volume V, An Historical Atlas of Pembrokeshire. Wales: Pembrokeshire Historical Trust.

Offprints from the Vernacular Architecture Group Library

  • Atkinson, Frank. 1960. Dives House Barn at Dalton, Near Huddersfield, offprint from Yorkshire Archaeological Journal, Number 158, pp. 192-196. Leeds: Yorkshire Archaeological Society.
  • Atkinson, Frank; Ward, Anne. 1964. A Pair of “Clog” Wheels from Northern England (of the early 19th century), offprint from Transactions of the Yorkshire Dialect Society, Part 44, Volume 11, pp. 33-40. York: Yorkshire Dialect Society.
  • Colman, Sylvia. 1971. The Hearth Tax Returns for the Hundred of Blackbourne, 1662, offprint from The Proceedings of the Suffolk Institute of Archaeology, volume 32(2), pp. 168-192. Ipswich: Suffolk Institute of Archaeology.
  • Hutton, Barbara. 1984. The Old Vicarage Church Fenton, offprint from Yorkshire Archaeological Journal, Volume 56, pp. 75-86. Leeds: Yorkshire Archaeological Society.
  • Hutton, Kenneth. 1974. Cheesecake Hall, Oulton, West Riding, offprint from Yorkshire Archaeological Journal, Volume 46, pp. 82-86. Leeds: Yorkshire Archaeological Society.
  • Pacey, A.J. 1964. Norland Upper Hall, offprint from Yorkshire Archaeological Journal, Volume 41, pp. 307-310. Leeds: Yorkshire Archaeological Society.
  • Perry, R.C. 1976. An Introduction to the Houses of Pembrokeshire, off-print from Transactions of the Woolhope Naturalists’ Club, Volume 42(1), pp. 6-15. Leominster: Orphans Press Ltd.
  • Tonkin, J.W. 1974. The Nunnery of Limebrook and its Property, offprint from Transactions of the Woolhope Naturalists’ Club, pp. 149-164. Leominster: Orphans Press Ltd.
  • Tonkin, J.W. 1976. The Palaces of the Bishop of Hereford, off-print from Transactions of the Woolhope Naturalists’ Club, Volume 42(1), pp. 53-64. Leominster: Orphans Press Ltd.

Journals

  • Architect’s Journal Volume 246 (Part 13, 11/07/2019; Part 14, 25/07/2019; Part 15, 08/08/2019 & Part 16, 22/08/2019).
  • Architect’s Journal Specification July (2019).
  • British Archaeology Volume 168 (September/October 2019).
  • Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies Volume 077 (Summer 2019).
  • CHERISH News Volume 4 (July 2019).
  • Community Archaeology & Heritage Journal Volume 6 (Number 3, August 2019).
  • Current Archaeology Volume 354 (September 2019).
  • Current World Archaeology Volume 96 (August/September 2019).
  • Landscapes Volume 19 (Number 1, July 2018).
  • Maplines: The magazine of the British Cartographic Society Volume 35 (Part 2, Summer 2019).
  • Montgomeryshire Collections Volume 107 (2019).
  • Panel for Historical Engineering Works Newsletter Volume 161 (2019).
  • Past: The Newsletter of the Prehistoric Society Volume 92 (Summer 2019).
  • PenCambria Volume 41 (Summer 2019).
  • Railway Magazine Volume 94 (Number 0573 1948) to Volume 161 (Number 1377 2015).
  • Sea Breezes Volume 2 to Volume 24 (1920 to 1939).
  • Sheetlines: The journal of the Charles Close Society Volume 115 (August: 2019).
  • Tools and Trades History Society Newsletter Volume 143 (Trinity 2019).
  • Vernacular Architecture Group Newsletter Volume 76 & 77 (January & July 2019).

Journals: Current Awareness

  • Architect’s Journal Volume 246 (Part 13, 11/07/2019) p. 21 review of the end-of-year show at the Welsh School of Architecture. P.40 Focus on the work of two Welsh School of Architecture students.
  • British Archaeology Volume 168 (September/October 2019) p. 57-59 Casefiles, Hope Parish Church, Flintshire, Cyllene Griffiths – the conservation of the wall paintings has led to the deciphering of the text.
  • Current Archaeology Volume 354 (September 2019) p. 64-65 Sherds, Chris Catling,discusses the listing of the Big Apple Kiosk, Mumbles and the possible listing of Capel Celyn Memorial Chapel, Llandderfel which commemorates the loss of the village Capel Celyn which was flooded to create a reservoir to supply water for Liverpool.
  • PenCambria Volume 41 (Summer 2019) p. 40-41 The King’s Rent Hole: a Radnorshire Folk-tradition, Adam Coward (RCAHMW) and p. 41-42 Paviland Cave and the Ice Age Hunters, David Leighton (RCAHMW).
  • Sheetlines: The Journal of the Charles Close Society Volume 115 (August: 2019) p. 23-25 Cardiff: Revision for Defence – and attack! Chris Hegley.
Glaslyn Lake, 2012
Glaslyn Lake, 2012
AP_2012_4107

Contact us

If you have any comments or enquiries, please feel free to contact us:

NMRW Library and Enquiries Service
Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Wales
Penglais Road
Aberystwyth
Ceredigion SY23 3BU

Telephone: +44 (0)1970 621200
Fax: +44 (0)1970 627701
Email: nmr.wales@rcahmw.gov.uk
Website: rcahmw.gov.uk

Croesewir gohebiaeth yn y Gymraeg a’r Saesneg | Correspondence welcomed in Welsh and English

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Dinas Dinlle Hillfort, Gwynedd https://rcahmw.gov.uk/dinas-dinlle-hillfort-gwynedd/ https://rcahmw.gov.uk/dinas-dinlle-hillfort-gwynedd/#respond Thu, 22 Aug 2019 09:11:33 +0000 https://rcahmw.gov.uk/?p=16356 Dinas Dinlle coastal hillfort is owned by the National Trust. It is set on a hill of glacial drift sediments (specifically a thrust-block moraine) overlooking the sea and Caernarfonshire coastal plain. The hillfort and Second World War seagull trench on the northern slopes of the fort are protected as Scheduled Monuments by Cadw and the hill is a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI), designated for the importance of the glacial sediments, clearly seen in the exposed sections of till, sand and gravel in the cliff face. These deposits result from ice re-advance from the Welsh ice cap towards the Irish Sea Ice Stream during deglaciation at the end of the last glaciation, known as the ‘Devensian’ period, some 12,000 years ago. It is hoped that direct dating of these sediments using Optically Stimulated Luminescence dating (OSL) should reveal just how long ago these sediments were laid down.

Contents

1. How old is the hillfort?
2. Recent history
3. How much of the fort has been lost over the centuries?
4. Reconstructing the past environment at Dinas Dinlle
5. How is climate change effecting the site?
6. What is CHERISH doing at the site
7. Investigations to improve our knowledge of the hillfort 2017-2021

1. How old is the hillfort?

Little is known about the monument. It is thought to be later prehistoric (Iron Age) in date but chance finds of Roman coins, an intaglio (a carved gemstone worn in a ring) and pottery suggest occupation in the Roman period. There is a possibility that the prominent, squarish stone mound inside the fort is the remains of a building or tower; could it be a Roman pharos or lighthouse? Early medieval occupation of this prominent site is also very likely; Dinas Dinlle takes its name from one of the Welsh legends of the Mabinogi and the story of Math mab Mathonwy and Lleu Llaw Gyffes, who gave his name to the hillfort Dinlle (‘din’ in old Welsh meaning fort and ‘Lle’ short for Lleu).

Rim sherd of 2nd-4th century AD Roman Black Burnished Ware from Dorset, found at the base of the cliff in 2005
Rim sherd of 2nd-4th century AD Roman Black Burnished Ware from Dorset, found at the base of the cliff in 2005

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2. Recent history

In the early 20th century the hillfort formed part of a golf course, whilst during the Second World War a pill box, seagull trench and observation post were constructed on the northern slopes to protect nearby RAF Llandwrog – now Caernarfon Airport.

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3. How much of the fort has been lost over the centuries?

Early maps and the curve of the surviving hillfort defences suggest that it was once entirely enclosed but today the majority of the western defences have been lost to the sea following years of erosion. It is difficult to say precisely how much of the hillfort has been lost since its construction but measuring cliff top positions using Ordnance Survey mapping we calculate that between 20 to 40 metres of the western side has been lost since 1900. Assuming that future rates of erosion will be higher than those observed over the last 117 years, due to climate change, Dinas Dinlle could be completely lost within 500 years.

Map of Dinas Dinlle showing cliff top positions in 1900, 1917, 1977 and 2017 Most recently, erosion has been focused at the southern end of the fort where recent mass movement has taken place
Map of Dinas Dinlle showing cliff top positions in 1900, 1917, 1977 and 2017 Most recently, erosion has been focused at the southern end of the fort where recent mass movement has taken place
Calculated maximum and average erosion magnitudes and rates at Dinas Dinlle
Calculated maximum and average erosion magnitudes and rates at Dinas Dinlle

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4. Reconstructing the past environment at Dinas Dinlle – A wave-washed hillfort in late Iron Age times?

Exposed peat deposits in the intertidal area on the foreshore around 100m west of the foot of the cliff below Dinas Dinlle hillfort date from around 4,000 years ago (Bronze Age) and confirm that a brackish-freshwater deltaic environment existed here at that time, with the sea estimated to have been around 1km away. The presence of the peat also provides us with a maximum extent of the glacial hill upon which the fort was constructed, and as sea levels flooded this former environment so erosion of the glacial sediments began.

Exposed peat deposits in the intertidal area
Exposed peat deposits in the intertidal area

Ongoing work by Birkbeck, University of London, with Aberystwyth University and CHERISH to date the sand spit of Morfa Dinlle north of the fort (using OSL/Luminescence dating) suggests it only dates back to Roman times. This means that the sea – or salt marsh – may have extended from the northern foot of Dinas Dinlle (where the village is now) in the later Iron Age.

The CHERISH team have also been coring and sampling in the surrounding former wetlands to the east of the hillfort and initial results are promising. Sediment cores have been obtained from 2 locations to hopefully provide a palaeoenvironmental context for the occupation phase of the fort. Radiocarbon ages suggests the record extends back around 3,000 years and work is on-going to look at the vegetation and hydrological histories.

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5. How is climate change effecting the site?

The recently published UK Climate Projections (UKCP2018) provides the most up-to-date assessment of how the climate of the UK may change over the 21st century. The continuing trends are:

• Warmer mean temperatures
• Hotter, drier summers
• Warmer, wetter winters
• More frequent extreme weather

The outcome of these trends is wide ranging – rising sea levels; the migration and proliferation of pests, diseases and invasive species; the drying out and desiccation of soils; flooding and more frequent storms –all present significant challenges and impacts to Dinas Dinlle.

The effects of the sea: Rising sea-levels and storm surges will lead to increased erosion of the cliff face and monument.

The effects of intense rainfall and drought: Recent observations after periods of intense rainfall show that sub-surface water flow is pushing off the front of the cliff face in places. Sub-surface flow could lead to mass movement events, while the southern ditches of the hillfort would appear to route some overland and sub-surface flow towards the cliff face in times of high rainfall; the ditches effectively act like gutters.

More intense rainfall with climate change could increase this erosion, coupled with periods of more intense drought which desiccate the fragile coastal soils leading to wind erosion and the creation of cracks which allow the formation of natural soil pipes under the surface.

The southern hillfort ditch before and after fresh cliff collapseThe southern hillfort ditch recorded on 14 Feb 2019, exacerbated by intense rainfall funnelling water along the fort’s ditch

The southern hillfort ditch before (left) and after (right) fresh cliff collapse, recorded on 14 Feb 2019, exacerbated by intense rainfall funnelling water along the fort’s ditch

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6. What is CHERISH doing at the site:

High-tech baseline monitoring of the fort: 2017-2021

Dinas Dinlle is a baseline monitoring site for CHERISH. This work has included gathering highly accurate (centimetre and sub-centimetre) 3D data to monitor the eroding cliff edge using techniques such as terrestrial laser scanning and UAV/drone survey. This will provide an accurate baseline for future monitoring and with analysis of historical documents such as aerial photographs and mapping, will reconstruct as accurately as possible erosion rates over the past 150 years. Repeat monitoring visits by CHERISH and a team of dedicated local residents will also see how seasonal and storm impacts are affecting the monument.

3D Laser Scanning of the cliff face to monitor erosion, June 2018
3D Laser Scanning of the cliff face to monitor erosion, June 2018

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7. Investigations to improve our knowledge of the hillfort 2017-2021

As well as monitoring Dinas Dinlle, CHERISH Project work is also about increasing our knowledge and understanding of it. In the area around the hillfort, sediment coring from the surrounding wetlands and luminescence dating of the sand spit at Morfa Dinlle will help reconstruct past environments and climate change (see above) using the physical, biological and chemical evidence trapped within layers of sediments.
At the monument itself, new earthwork and geophysical surveys have greatly increased our understanding of the archaeological remains with numerous possible roundhouses and other anomalies identified within the interior of the fort and the field to the south; these are the focus of the August 2019 excavation.

Under full supervision and following months of planning and training, in early June 2019 CHERISH archaeologists and geographers from the Royal Commission and Aberystwyth University carried out investigations to record and date features exposed in the eroding cliff-face, including the southern hillfort ditch exposed during the cliff collapse in February 2019. The southern ramparts were also cored to find out more about the hillfort’s construction.

Initial results have been extremely interesting, bringing into question the way in which Dinas Dinlle was constructed. Both the cliff-face investigations and coring yielded very little in the way of archaeological remains which was unexpected. Even the southern ditch appears to have not been ’built’ but formed naturally through complex hydrological processes during the end of the last glacial period around 12,000 years ago. Stony material discovered through coring the ramparts does however suggest some construction, meaning the people responsible for building Dinas Dinlle could well have exploited pre-existing natural features to steepen the slopes and accentuate their constructed banks.

Perhaps the existence of natural ‘ramparts’ and ‘defences’ – coupled with a prominent coastal position – first attracted prehistoric settlers to the site?

Don’t look down! CHERISH team members Patrick and Louise battling with heights and ropes to record eroding features
Don’t look down! CHERISH team members Patrick and Louise battling with heights and ropes to record eroding features
The cleaned ditch section. A UAV image showing the remains of a natural melt-water channel that was likely adopted to form part of the fort's defences
The cleaned ditch section. A UAV image showing the remains of a natural melt-water channel that was likely adopted to form part of the fort’s defences

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Library closure week: 12 – 16 August 2019 https://rcahmw.gov.uk/library-closure-week-12-16-august-2019/ https://rcahmw.gov.uk/library-closure-week-12-16-august-2019/#respond Thu, 08 Aug 2019 10:56:51 +0000 https://rcahmw.gov.uk/?p=16330 New NMRW serachroom
New NMRW serachroom

The library and search room will be closed and the enquiry service suspended from Monday 12 August until Friday 16 August 2019. Enquiries and orders received during this period will not be acknowledged or dealt with until we reopen on 19 August 2019.

We are sorry for any inconvenience this may cause.

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Welcome to Issue 4 of CHERISH news, led by the Royal Commission https://rcahmw.gov.uk/welcome-to-issue-4-of-cherish-news-led-by-the-royal-commission/ https://rcahmw.gov.uk/welcome-to-issue-4-of-cherish-news-led-by-the-royal-commission/#respond Mon, 05 Aug 2019 11:07:35 +0000 https://rcahmw.gov.uk/?p=16314 Welcome to Issue 4 of CHERISH news, a European-funded project led by the Royal Commission, in partnership with the Discovery Programme: Centre for Archaeology and Innovation Ireland, Aberystwyth University: Department of Geography and Earth Sciences and Geological Survey, Ireland.

CHERISH News Letter No. 4
CHERISH News Letter No. 4

Download Web Version (4.4Mb)

Welcome to the fourth issue of the CHERISH newsletter which marks the middle of our five-year project. This issue brings you the project highlights of a busy period between January and June 2019.  In this issue we bring you highlights of some of our most ambitious work to date, which includes a new programme of joint-nation peat coring in south-west Ireland, ambitious UAV mapping of entire stretches of eroding Irish coast, cliff-face excavations of a threatened coastal fort, and a seminar and training school on archaeological aerial survey using aircraft and UAVs.

For day-to-day news and features – and to see where the CHERISH team is working – don’t forget to look at our website (www.cherishproject.eu), Facebook (Cherish Project) and Twitter pages (@CHERISHproj).

If you’d like a printed copy to fully appreciate the wonderful images please contact cherish@rcahmw.gov.uk.

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