CBHC / RCAHMW https://rcahmw.gov.uk On the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Wales Wed, 17 Jul 2019 10:59:45 +0000 en-GB hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.2.2 Seeking Relatives of First World War Hero of Anti-submarine Underwater Sound Detection https://rcahmw.gov.uk/seeking-relatives-of-first-world-war-hero-of-anti-submarine-underwater-sound-detection/ https://rcahmw.gov.uk/seeking-relatives-of-first-world-war-hero-of-anti-submarine-underwater-sound-detection/#respond Wed, 17 Jul 2019 10:41:54 +0000 https://rcahmw.gov.uk/?p=16248 The Royal Commission’s U Boat Project 1914-18 team are seeking relatives of the late Benjamin Davies (1863-1957) for information about their ancestor’s work with the Admiralty during the First World War.

Pictured here in 1908, HMS SURLY was a Rocket class destroyer built in 1894 on the Clyde. Source; postcard view published by Cozens & Co, Portsmouth. Source: RCAHMW
Pictured here in 1908, HMS SURLY was a Rocket class destroyer built in 1894 on the Clyde. Source; postcard view published by Cozens & Co, Portsmouth. Source: RCAHMW

Benjamin Davies (1863-1957)

The team have discovered two fascinating notebooks containing details of experiments conducted by Benjamin Davies which explore the properties of different types of early underwater listening devices used to detect enemy submarines. The notebooks, located amongst papers deposited in the National Library of Wales in the early 1980s describe calculations, design ideas, and practical trials. For example, in July 1918, Davies went onboard the destroyer HMS SURLY off Weymouth to conduct a trial, during which a British submarine circled the destroyer so that the sensitivity of Davies’ new hydrophone could be tested.

These photographs show the whirling machine designed by Professor Oliver Lodge in the early 1890s for experiments with ether. To construct the whirling machine, Lodge secured a grant from the Royal Society to pay for an assistant, Benjamin Davies (seen immediately to the right of whirling machine in his shirt sleeves). Source: Cadbury Research Library OJL5/2, University of Birmingham.
These photographs show the whirling machine designed by Professor Oliver Lodge in the early 1890s for experiments with ether. To construct the whirling machine, Lodge secured a grant from the Royal Society to pay for an assistant, Benjamin Davies (seen immediately to the right of whirling machine in his shirt sleeves). Source: Cadbury Research Library OJL5/2, University of Birmingham.

Benjamin Davies was born in Llangynllo, Cardiganshire, in 1863, and was the eldest of three children. He joined the Eastern Telegraph Company in 1908, eventually becoming the head of the research department before retiring in 1922. His daughter, Gwenhwyfar Davies, taught at the School of Arts and Crafts, University College of Wales, Aberystwyth from 1929-1959, and was responsible for ensuring that her father’s scientific notebooks were deposited in the National Library of Wales.

The 1939 Register provides a snapshot of the civilian population of England and Wales just after the outbreak of the Second World War. The survey was undertaken on 29 September 1939 and was used to produce wartime identity cards, ration cards, and to inform call up for war service. In his entry, Benjamin Davies gives his occupation as ‘Physics applied in Submarines, Electrical Engineer Research…’. Source: The National Archives, Kew, R39/7555/7554D/017
The 1939 Register provides a snapshot of the civilian population of England and Wales just after the outbreak of the Second World War. The survey was undertaken on 29 September 1939 and was used to produce wartime identity cards, ration cards, and to inform call up for war service. In his entry, Benjamin Davies gives his occupation as ‘Physics applied in Submarines, Electrical Engineer Research…’. Source: The National Archives, Kew, R39/7555/7554D/017

If you are a member of Benjamin or Gwenhwyfar Davies’ family, please get in touch.

Email: LlongauU@cbhc.gov.uk / UBoat@rcahmw.gov.uk
Phone: 01970 621200
website: https://uboatproject.wales/ / https://prosiectllongauu.cymru/

The U-Boat Project now offers unprecedented access to some of the wrecks from the First World War on our website.

On a virtual dive, you can explore 3D, interactive models of eight wartime wrecks. As you dive around the wrecks and explore them from all sides, hotspots will guide you to particular points of interest. Pop-up windows will show you historical photographs, ship plans or drawings and contain explanatory notes.
https://uboatproject.wales/virtual-dive/

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List of Historic Welsh Place Names now over 660,000 Records https://rcahmw.gov.uk/list-of-historic-welsh-place-names-now-over-660000-records/ https://rcahmw.gov.uk/list-of-historic-welsh-place-names-now-over-660000-records/#respond Fri, 12 Jul 2019 11:26:24 +0000 https://rcahmw.gov.uk/?p=16168 The List of Historic Welsh Place Names received the Cynefin Project data from the National Library of Wales just before Christmas, and since then, we have been going through them and cleansing the data in order to upload them to the List. This meant going through over 900,000 records, and pulling out each one that wasn’t actually a name, like ‘field’ or ‘house and garden’. This work is now completed, and we are happy to announce we have an additional 515,902 names to add to the list.

Over 500,000 Place names added to the list

These include names in Welsh, English, and a mixture of the two, some of them particularly interesting, such as Cae Dungeon in Glascwm, Radnorshire. Why was there a dungeon in a rural parish? There’s also Maes y Droell in Llanarmon yn Iâl, Denbighsire, which according to local tradition got its name because a woman was killed there with a spinning wheel (troell).

List of Historic Place Names
List of Historic Place Names

Commission’s Place Names Officer James January-McCann

Many people collecting information for the tithe wrote ‘ditto’ rather than repeating names in order to save time. As well as removing the non-name results, the Commission’s Place Names Officer James January-McCann has also been extracting the dittos, and keeping them to one side. There’s a little over twenty thousand of them, all told. Each datum comes with a link to the original tithe key, so replacing the dittos with the real names will be simple enough, and we intend to do this once the first half million names have been uploaded.

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Royal Commission Archive & Library Bulletin of Newly Catalogued Material – June 2019 https://rcahmw.gov.uk/royal-commission-archive-library-bulletin-of-newly-catalogued-material-june-2019/ https://rcahmw.gov.uk/royal-commission-archive-library-bulletin-of-newly-catalogued-material-june-2019/#respond Fri, 28 Jun 2019 08:46:32 +0000 https://rcahmw.gov.uk/?p=16177 Welcome to the latest monthly edition of the National Monuments Record of Wales (NMRW) Archives and Library Bulletin which lists all newly catalogued material. The archival items, library books and journal articles are all available to view in our public reading room. The full archive catalogue is available on Coflein and contains digital copies of many of the items listed. All publications may be found on our online Library Catalogue.

Our Library and reading room is open:
Monday – Friday 09.30 – 16.00,
Wednesday 10.30 – 16.30.
An appointment is advisable.

Archives

Llangollen Police Station, 2014     Ref. DS2014_056_001     C.583202     NPRN: 419758
Llangollen Police Station, 2014 Ref. DS2014_056_001 C.583202 NPRN: 419758

Cadw Listed Buildings 35mm Colour Negative Collection: Ref. CLBN

Colour negatives, relating to listed buildings in Wales, taken by Cadw during their listed building resurvey programme
Covering dates: 1980-2010

Emergency Recording Collection

  • Digital photographic record and survey plans relating to the former Llawrybettws Welsh Calvinistic Methodist chapel, Glanyrafon, Corwen, 2019: NPRN 12095
Former Police Station, Machynlleth , 2015     Ref. DS2015_091_001     C.606498     NPRN: 421003
Former Police Station, Machynlleth , 2015 Ref. DS2015_091_001 C.606498 NPRN: 421003

Flintshire County Council Collection

  • Colour photographs and negatives showing a variety of buildings, mainly in Flintshire. Donated by the Conservation Department of Flintshire County Council, in advance of relocation to new offices: Ref. FCCC/04

RCAHMW Colour Oblique Digital Aerial Photographs

  • Colour oblique digital aerial photographs, taken during the Royal Commission’s programme of archaeological aerial reconnaissance, 2013: Ref. AP2019_561 – AP2019_595
Swansea Police station, 2005     Ref. DI2007_0300     C.423940     NPRN: 31764
Swansea Police station, 2005 Ref. DI2007_0300 C.423940 NPRN: 31764

Books

All our books and journals can be found on the Royal Commission’s Library Catalogue and viewed in our Library and Search Room.

  • Bodnant Garden. Norwich: Jarrold Publishing.
  • Barber, Alistair et al. 2019. The prehistoric archaeology of the A477 St Clears to Red Roses Road improvement scheme 2012. Cirencester : Cotswold Archaeology.
  • Bradley, Richard & Nimura, Courtney. 2016. The use and reuse of stone circles : fieldwork at five Scottish monuments and its implications. Oxford : Oxbow Books.
  • Bradley, Richard et al. 2016. The later prehistory of North-West Europe : the evidence of development-led fieldwork. Oxford : Oxford University Press.
  • Griffiths, Ralph & Roger S. Thomas. 2018. The Principality of Wales in the Later Middle Ages : The Structure and Personnel of Government : South Wales, 1277-1536. Cardiff : University of Wales Press.
  • Leech, Alan & Sally Leech. 2009. Struggle for survival in the Cardiganshire hills: story of the settlement of the mountains of Llanfair and Llanddewi. Llanfair Clydogau : Alan & Sally Leech.
  •  Leech, Alan. 2011. Dan Jenkins: a biography: his life and times in Cardiganshire and Carmarthenshire. Talybont: Y Llofa.
  • Leech, Alan. 2016. Llanfair Clydogau: history of a Cardiganshire parish. Llanfair Clydogau : Alan Leech.
  • Leech, Alan. 2017. William Jones: politics, Glandenys and the lover’s graves. Llanfair Clydogau : Alan Leech.
  • Leech, Sally. 2018. Llanfair Clydogau: battles over, a village remembers. Llanfair Clydogau: Llanfair Clydogau Community.
  • Lynn, Paul A. 2019. World heritage canal: Thomas Telford and the Pontcysyllte Aqueduct. Dunbeath [Scotland]: Whittles Publishing.
  • Oosthuizen, Susan. 2019. The Emergence of the English. Croydon : CPI Group.
  • Stephenson, David. 2019. Medieval Wales c. 1050 – 1332: centuries of ambiguity. Cardiff: University of Wales Press.
  • Whittle, A. W. R. & Cummings, Vikki (Eds.). Going over : the Mesolithic-Neolithic transition in north-west Europe. Oxford : Oxford University Press.
  • Williams, David. 2017. Y Wladfa fach fynyddig [The little hillside settlement] situated in the parishes of Llanddewi Brefi and Llanfairclydogau. Llanfair Clydogau : Alan and Sally Leech.

Offprints from the Vernacular Architecture Group Library

  • Bans, Jean-Christian. 1980. Notes sur les Granges-Etables ovalaires du Limousin, off print of Revue Félibréenne et Régionaliste, n. 76, pp. 1-24. Tulle: Lemouzi.
  • Baumgarten, Karl. 1965. Zur Frage Einer Ethnographischen Hausforschung in Deutschland, off print from Europa et Hungaria: Congressus Ethnographicus in Hungaria, 16-20, x., pp. 189-195. Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó.
  • Baumgarten, Von Karl. 1965. Die Tischordnung im alten mecklenburgischen Bauernhaus, off print from Deutsches Jahrbuch für Volkskunde, Band 11, Teil 1, pp. 5-15. Berlin: Akademie-Verlag.
  • Baumgarten, Von Karl. 1965. Diele und Dreschen im mecklenburgischen Hallenhaus, off print from Zeitschrift für Agrargeschichte und Agrarsoziologie, Jahrgang 13, Heft 1, pp. 28-34. Frankfurt am Main: DLG-Verlags-GmbH.
  • Baumgarten, Karl. 1966. Der Skansen-Gedanke heute, off print from Neue Museumskunde, Jahrgang 9, Heft 1, pp. 18-25.  Berlin: VEB Deutscher Verlag der Wissenschaften.
  • Baumgarten, Von Karl. 1967. Nachbarschaftshilfe beim ländlichen Hausbau in Mecklenburg, off print from Deutsches Jahrbuch für Volkskunde, Band 13, Teil 1, pp. 15-26. Berlin: Akademie-Verlag.
  • Baumgarten, Karl; Bentzien, Ulrich. 1971. Denkmalhof Klockenhagen. Heimatmuseum: Ribnitz-Damgarten.
  • Baumgarten, Von Karl. 1971. Ethnographische Bemerkungen zum Grabungsbefund Hohenrode, off print from Ausgrabungen und Funde, Band 16, Heft 1, pp.  49-54. Berlin: Akademie-Verlag.
  • Baumgarten, Karl. 1982. Die Auswirkungen der agarreformen des 19. Jahrhunderts auf das dominale Bauernhaus Mecklenburgs, chapter from book Vom Bauen und Wohnen: 20 Jahre Arbeitskreis für Haus- und Siedlungsforschung in der DDR, ed. Rach, Hans-Jürgen; Balke, Mitarbeit von Lotar; Baumgarten, Karl; Wirth, Hermann, pp. 172-180. Berlin: Akademie-Verlag.
  • Baumgarten, Karl. 1982. Einige Bemerkungen zur Entwicklung des Ackerbürgerhauses in Mecklenburg chapter from book Vom Bauen und Wohnen: 20 Jahre Arbeitskreis für Haus- und Siedlungsforschung in der DDR ed. Rach, Hans-Jürgen; Balke, Mitarbeit von Lotar; Baumgarten, Karl; Wirth, Hermann, pp. 150-158. Berlin: Akademie-Verlag.
  • Baumgarten, Karl. 1982. Zur Frage der Reglementierung ländlichen Bauens im Mecklenburg des 18. Jahrhunderts, chapter from book Vom Bauen und Wohnen: 20 Jahre Arbeitskreis für Haus- und Siedlungsforschung in der DDR ed. Rach, Hans-Jürgen; Balke, Mitarbeit von Lotar; Baumgarten, Karl; Wirth, Hermann, pp. 86-92. Berlin: Akademie-Verlag.
  • Beaton, E. 1976. Notes on “Stake and Rice”, Elgin, off print from Moray Field Club Paper, number 13. Elgin: Moray Field Club.
  • Carré, Gaël; Litoux, Emmanuel; Hunot, Jean-Yves. 2002. Les Ligneries à Charentilly (Indre-Loire): du logis à sale basse au manoir du XV ͤs., off print from Revue Archéologique du Centre de la France, Tome 41, pp. 239-263. Tours: Fédération pour l’édition de la Revue archéologique due Centre de la France.
  • Chenevix-Trench, John; Fenley, Pauline. 1979. A Base-Cruck Hall in Denham, off print of Records of Bucks, volume 21, pp. 3-10. Aylesbury: Buckinghamshire Archaeological Society.
  • Ed. Von Robert Auty. 1989. Extract from Lexikon des Mittelalters, vol. 4, 1957-1980. München; Zürich: Artemis-Verlag.
  • Haahr, Dorte; Kayser, Kjeld; Lerche, Grith. 1966. Bebyggelse og Bygningsforandringer gennem 200 år, chapter from book Ildebrandshuse: En bygningshistorisk og etnologisk undersøgelse af 24 ejendomme I gaderne Åbenrå-Lande-mærket i København, ed. Poul Strømsted, pp. 17-60. Copenhagen: Nationalmuseet.
  • Hinz, Hermann. 1982. Der Donjon Von Salives, chapter from book Mélanges d’archéologie et d’histoire
  • médiévales en l’honneur du Doyen Michel de Boüard, pp. 191-198. Genève: Librairie Droz.
  • Møller, Elna; Olsen, Olaf. 1961. Danske Trækirker, off print of Nationalmuseets Arbejdsmark, pp. 35-58. København: Nationalmuseet.
  • Obereiner, Jean-Luc. 1980. Une Gariotte à toit Pyramidal à Faycelles, off print from Quercy-Recherche, Numéro 34, pp. 1-7. Cahors: Comité de Diffusion de la Recherche Quercynoise.
  • Obereiner, Jean-Luc. 1980. Épis de Faîtage en Quercy: Technique et Symbolisme, off print from Quercy-Recherche, Numéro 35/36, pp. 97-160. Cahors: Comité de Diffusion de la Recherche Quercynoise.
  • Stell, C.F. 1966. Hill Farm, Chalfont St. Peter, off print from Records of Bucks, volume 18, part 1, pp. 73-77. Aylesbury: Buckinghamshire Archaeological Society.
  • Stell, C.F. 1969. Houses in High Street, Chalfont St. Peter, off print from Records of Bucks, volume 18, part 4, pp. 277-287. Aylesbury: Buckinghamshire Archaeological Society.

Journals

  • Ancient Monuments Society/The Friends of Friendless Churches Newsletter Part 2 (Summer 2019).
  • Architects’ Journal Volume 246 (Part 10, 30 May 2019).
  • AJ Specification May (2019).
  • British Archaeology Volume 167 (July/August 2019).
  • Cartographic Journal Volume 56 (Number 1, February 2019).
  • Chapels Society Newsletter Volume 71 (May 2019).
  • Council for British Archaeology Newsletter Issue 46 (June to September 2019).
  • Current Archaeology Volume 350 (May 2019).
  • Current Archaeology Volume 352 (July 2019).
  • Current World Archaeology Volume 95 (June/July 2019).
  • Industrial Archaeology Review Volume 41 (Number 1, May 2019).
  • Railway Magazine (1948-1986).
  • Welsh Historic Gardens Trust Bulletin Issue 77 (Spring/Summer 2019).
  • Yorkshire Buildings Volume 46 (2018).

Journals: Current Awareness

  • Ancient Monuments Society/The Friends of Friendless Churches Newsletter Part 2 (Summer 2019) p.11 Casework: St Mary’s Church, Mold, P.12 St John the Baptist, Penhow, Our Lady of the Rosary, Penmaenmawr, Jerusalem Chapel, Port Amlwch. The Friends of Friendless Church – P.18 St Brothen’s Church, Llanfrothen, P.19 the Old Church, Manordeifi, P.25 Spirit Cymru Project, P.28 St Teilo’s Church, Llanarth, P.32 launch of a campaign for a national archive for Welsh architecture, AGM to be held 6/7/2019 at Gregynog Hall, Tregynon.
  • British Archaeology Volume 167 (July/August 2019) p.13, ‘Lies in the Landscape’ Mike Sharp deciphering the remains of structures intended to confound invading aircraft – decoy fire-site control centre Ffrith Mountain, Flintshire. P.58 Fieldwork – Moel Arthur Excavations run by the Clwydian Rang Archaeology Group 30/07/2019 to 09/08/2019. P.59 Living History Festival 13-14/07/2019.
  • Current Archaeology Volume 350 (May 2019) p.48 a summer dig advertised at Meillionydd, Rhiw, Llyn and Roman Samian Pottery Workshop at National Roman Legion Museum, Caerleon.
  • Current Archaeology Volume 352 (July 2019) p.62 Open Day at the excavation site, Pen y Bryn Barracks, Dorothea Quarry, Dyffyn Nantlle.

Contact us

If you have any comments or enquiries, please feel free to contact us:

NMRW Library and Enquiries Service
Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Wales
Penglais Road
Aberystwyth
Ceredigion SY23 3BU

Telephone: +44 (0)1970 621200
Fax: +44 (0)1970 627701
Email: nmr.wales@rcahmw.gov.uk
Website: rcahmw.gov.uk

Croesewir gohebiaeth yn y Gymraeg a’r Saesneg | Correspondence welcomed in Welsh and English

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Archaeology at the edge! https://rcahmw.gov.uk/archaeology-at-the-edge/ https://rcahmw.gov.uk/archaeology-at-the-edge/#respond Fri, 21 Jun 2019 08:28:00 +0000 https://rcahmw.gov.uk/?p=16150 CHERISH Project continues to unearth the secrets of Dinas Dinlle coastal fort

The beginning of June saw CHERISH archaeologists and geographers from the Royal Commission and Aberystwyth University continuing their exciting investigations at the prehistoric coastal promontory fort of Dinas Dinlle (more information about Dinas Dinlle). Working closely with the National Trust, Cadw and Natural Resources Wales the team has been busy recording archaeology and geological features revealed by heavy terrestrial and coastal erosion of the western cliff-face. Cores were also taken from the southern banks and ditches of the fort to understand a bit more about how it was constructed and to recover any datable environmental remains.

Dinas Dinlle coastal fort is owned by the National Trust. It is set on a hill of glacial drift sediments overlooking the sea and Caernarfonshire coastal plain. The fort is protected as a Scheduled Monument whilst the hill itself is a Site of Special Scientific Interest, designated for the geological importance of glacial sediments. (Crown Copyright: RCAHMW AP_2014_0877)
Dinas Dinlle coastal fort is owned by the National Trust. It is set on a hill of glacial drift sediments overlooking the sea and Caernarfonshire coastal plain. The fort is protected as a Scheduled Monument whilst the hill itself is a Site of Special Scientific Interest, designated for the geological importance of glacial sediments. (Crown Copyright: RCAHMW AP_2014_0877)

How to examine a steep, collapsing cliff edge

This new work presented a real challenge: How to examine a steep, collapsing cliff edge on a highly protected monument? The answer came with help from Plas y Brenin National Outdoor Centre who safely rigged and supervised the rope access for the archaeologists and geographers. The work went surprisingly smoothly, considering it was carried out several metres above the beach below!

Don’t look down! CHERISH team members Patrick and Louise battling with heights and ropes to record eroding features. (Crown Copyright: CHERISH)
Don’t look down! CHERISH team members Patrick and Louise battling with heights and ropes to record eroding features. (Crown Copyright: CHERISH)

Dinas Dinlle construction

Initial results have been extremely interesting, bringing into question the way in which Dinas Dinlle was originally constructed. Both the cliff-face investigations and coring yielded very little in the way of archaeological remains which, at a site defined by such dramatic earthworks, was unexpected. Even the southern ditch appears to have not been ’built’ but formed naturally through complex hydrological processes during the end of the last glacial period around 12,000 years ago. Stony material discovered through coring the ramparts does however suggest some construction, meaning the people responsible for building Dinas Dinlle could well have exploited pre-existing natural features to steepen the slopes and accentuate their constructed banks. Perhaps the existence of natural ‘ramparts’ and ‘defences’ – coupled with a prominent coastal position – first attracted prehistoric settlers to the site.

Investigations will continue throughout the project to monitor how much is being lost to the sea – and to the increasing effects of climate change on the monument – using techniques such as excavation, laser scanning and UAV surveying.

Dinas Dinlle excavation

Our work at Dinas Dinlle continues with our exciting volunteer excavation being led by Gwynedd Archaeological Trust in August, with a public open day on Saturday 17th August. This will be the first open excavation ever held at Dinas Dinlle. The possible remains of two prehistoric roundhouses situated close to the eroding cliff-face within the fort will be investigated along with the remains of medieval agricultural buildings and field boundaries to the south. Hopefully we will be able to prise some more of the fort’s secrets during the excavation!

A UAV image showing the remains of a natural melt-water channel that was likely adapted to form part of the fort's defences. (Crown Copyright: CHERISH)
A UAV image showing the remains of a natural melt-water channel that was likely adapted to form part of the fort’s defences. (Crown Copyright: CHERISH)

CHERISH (Climate, Heritage and Environments of Reefs, Islands and Headlands) is a 5 year European-funded Ireland-Wales project between the Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Wales, the Discovery Programme: Centre for Archaeology and Innovation Ireland, Aberystwyth University: Department of Geography and Earth Sciences and Geological Survey, Ireland.

The project aims to raise awareness and understanding of the past, present and near future impacts of climate change, storminess and extreme weather events on the rich cultural heritage of the Irish and Welsh regional seas and coast by employing the latest innovative techniques.

Find out more about the CHERISH project

Find out more about the CHERISH project at http://www.cherishproject.eu/en/ and for latest news and activities you can follow the project on Facebook @CherishProject and Twitter @CHERISHproj.

For more information on how to get involved with this summer’s excavation please contact Dan Amor at Gwynedd Archaeological Trust at dan.amor@heneb.co.uk   01248 366970

Daniel Hunt (Archaeological Investigator – CHERISH Project) daniel.hunt@rcahmw.gov.uk

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Student Rebecca Carlton writes about her work with the U-Boat Project https://rcahmw.gov.uk/student-rebecca-carlton-writes-about-her-work-with-the-u-boat-project/ https://rcahmw.gov.uk/student-rebecca-carlton-writes-about-her-work-with-the-u-boat-project/#respond Thu, 20 Jun 2019 09:27:56 +0000 https://rcahmw.gov.uk/?p=16136 My name is Rebecca, I am a second-year heritage student at the University of Wales Trinity Saint David, Lampeter Campus, and I am currently finishing my placement at the Royal Commission. My time at the Commission has been fun, diverse and fascinating. Whilst at the Royal Commission, I have been working on the U-Boat Project 1914-18: Commemorating the War at Sea. Working with the U-Boat team and the staff at the Commission has been a highlight of my second year. Not only have I found out about the inner workings of an archival service and the operations of the Commission, but I have also been a part of the U-Boat Project team that I would be proud to call home.

Ships Attacked by U-boats

Whilst working with the team at the Commission, I have had two main jobs. The first and principle task was to restructure the data gathered on the ships attacked by U-boats, and then give each file a unique reference code. When the project comes to its final stage at the end of the year, this new structure will make it easier to archive the data and information gathered in the previous two years. This data included files on the shipwrecks, crew lists of the ships, marine life on the shipwrecks, data and other information including newspaper articles that reported how ships were hit and sunk.  

Ships and U-boats involved in the war at sea around Wales

Secondly, throughout my time at the Commission, I have been helping to upload newspaper articles to the website Peoples’ Collection Wales (https://www.peoplescollection.wales/users/29486), that relate to the ships and U-boats involved in the war at sea around Wales.

Whilst archiving the items digitally, I have found a couple of items that become my favourites in the Collection. The first item is a video of the dive on the FV CARTAGENA, showing what the wreck looks like up close and the marine life on shipwrecks.

This video gives some impressions from the field school held in partnership with the NAS and the dives on the CARTAGENA. I enjoy Maritime History and love to look at shipwrecks because so much information can be gathered from them. They are evidence of trends in history and trading and show the craftsmanship of the people involved with the ship. I find these videos interesting because I get to see all of the sea life that lives around the wreck and other marine life like corals that make the shipwrecks their home.

Another favourite is the multibeam image of the SS DRINA. To look at all the multibeam data gathered by SECAMS is incredible, but SS DRINA is my favourite because unlike the other wrecks, this one has broken into two pieces. It is fascinating to see these images and get an impression of what it looks like on the seabed.

Multibeam image of the SS DRINA wreck
Multibeam image of the SS DRINA wreck.

I would personally like to thank the entire team of the U-Boat Project at the Royal Commission for an incredible and amazing experience.

By Rebecca Carlton

The entire team of the U-Boat Project would like to thank Rebecca for her time with us. Her work will help us archive the project at the end of our activity period and will ensure that our records can be studied by future visitors to the Library and Search Room and users of the Royal Commission’s archives.

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