Soar Welsh Independent Chapel, Lampeter. A town chapel rebuilt in 1874; photograph showing the congregation leaving the chapel c.1910.

Welsh Nonconformist Chapels: A National Architecture

Welsh chapels are arguably the most iconic buildings in Wales, but also one of the building types most at threat from closure, dereliction, and demolition. From the low-key vernacular chapels of the late 17th century to the confident urban chapels of industrial Wales, in this talk, Royal Commission Senior Investigator (Historic Buildings), Susan Fielding, will give an overview of chapel architecture and its place in Welsh society, as well as discussing the work of the Royal Commission in recording and understanding these important buildings. This illustrated talk will include explaining the layout of a nonconformist chapel, the development from simple, long-wall chapels of the 17th/18th centuries to the big show-front chapels of the late 19th century, and later developments in the 20th century. It will also discuss some of the major chapel architects, the social and educational uses of chapels, and some specific results from our recording project in terms of numbers, distributions, styles, names, and statistics on demolitions/conversions etc. This talk will be held online next Thursday, 3 June, at 5pm. For further information and booking please visit:

▶ Event: Welsh Nonconformist Chapels: A National Architecture


Soar Welsh Independent Chapel, Lampeter. A town chapel rebuilt in 1874; photograph showing the congregation leaving the chapel c.1910.
Soar Welsh Independent Chapel, Lampeter. A town chapel rebuilt in 1874; photograph showing the congregation leaving the chapel c.1910.

▶ Coflein site description and images: Soar Welsh Independent Chapel


The earliest surviving chapel in Wales, Maes-yr-onnen, Radnorshire, c.1697, converted from the cowhouse of a long-house and recorded for the Commission’s book, Houses and History in the March of Wales: Radnorshire 1400-1800. It was built after the Toleration Act, 1689.
The earliest surviving chapel in Wales, Maes-yr-onnen, Radnorshire, c.1697, converted from the cowhouse of a long-house and recorded for the Commission’s book, Houses and History in the March of Wales: Radnorshire 1400-1800. It was built after the Toleration Act, 1689.

▶ Coflein site description and images: Maes-yr-onnen Congregational Chapel


Soar-y-Mynydd, near Tregaron, a quintessentially rural chapel, built c. 1822, and perhaps the most photographed chapel in Wales
Soar-y-Mynydd, near Tregaron, a quintessentially rural chapel, built c. 1822, and perhaps the most photographed chapel in Wales.

▶ Coflein site description and images: Soar-y-mynydd Welsh Calvinistic Methodist Chapel


Capel Als the iconic Llanelli chapel, was first built in the later 18th century, rebuilt and enlarged in 1852 by the architect Thomas Thomas, Landore, and partially rebuilt again in 1894 by architect Owen Morris Roberts of Porthmadog.
Capel Als the iconic Llanelli chapel, was first built in the later 18th century, rebuilt and enlarged in 1852 by the architect Thomas Thomas, Landore, and partially rebuilt again in 1894 by architect Owen Morris Roberts of Porthmadog.

▶ Coflein site description and images: Capel Als Independent Chapel


Peniel, Tremadog, is an outstanding example of a chapel in classical style and was built 1810 for William Madocks, the founder of Tremadog. It was influenced by Inigo Jones’ St Paul’s Church, Covent Garden, of 1633.
Peniel, Tremadog, is an outstanding example of a chapel in classical style and was built 1810 for William Madocks, the founder of Tremadog. It was influenced by Inigo Jones’ St Paul’s Church, Covent Garden, of 1633.

▶ Coflein site description and images: Peniel Welsh Calvinistic Methodist Chapel

05/29/2021

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